Comfort ye, Comfort ye my people, saith your God

Comfort ye, Comfort ye my people, saith your God

Tune: [Comfort ye, Comfort ye my people]
Published in 1 hymnal

Representative Text

Comfort ye,
Comfort ye my people, saith your God.
Speak ye comfortably to Jerusalem,
cry unto her that her warfare is accomplish'd,
that her iniquity is pardon'd.

The voice of him that crieth in the wilderness,
Prepare ye the way of the Lord,
Make straight in the desert a highway for our God.

Ev'ry valley shall be exalted,
and ev'ry mountain and hill made low,
the crooked straight, and the rough places plain.

And the glory of the Lord shall be reveal'd, shall be reveal'd;
and all flesh shall see the salvation of God;
for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it.

The Lord gave the word;
Great was the company of the publishers.
The Lord gave the word;
Great was the company of the publishers.

How beautiful are the feet of him
that preacheth the gosple of peace,
that bringeth glad tidings,
that bringeth glad tidings of good,
that publisheth salvation,
That publisheth salvation.

How beautiful are the feet of him,
that bringeth glad tidings,
that bringeth glad tidings,
that bringeth glad tidings,
that publisheth peace,
that saith unto Zion, thy God reigneth
that saith unto Zion, thy God reigneth.

Break froth into joy,
break forth into joy,
glad tidings, glad tidings
break forth into joy,
break forth into joy,
glad tidings, glad tidings,
break forth into joy,
break forth into joy,
glad tidings, glad tidings,
break forth into joy,
break forth into joy.

For the Lord hath comforted his people,
hath comforted his people,
for the Lord hath comforted his people,
and turn'd again the captivity,
captivity of Zion.

The ransom'd of the Lord shall return to Zion.
The ransom'd of the Lord shall return ot Zion,
ascribing salvation, and glory, and honor, and power unto him,
that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb,
for ever and ever, forever and ever. Amen.
For ever and ever. Amen. Amen.



Source: Harmonia Americana: containing a concise introduction to the grounds of music; with a variety of airs, suitable fore divine worship and the use of musical societies; consisting of three and four parts #112

Text Information

First Line: Comfort ye, Comfort ye my people, saith your God
Language: English
Publication Date: 1791
Copyright: This text in in the public domain in the United States because it was published before 1923.
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