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Did Christ Descend From Majesty

Representative Text

1 Did Christ descend from majesty
To rescue you from sin?
For nails, did He exchange His crown
To make a worm His kin?

2 Has consolation from His hand
Relieved your grief and fear?
Or has His love all comforting
Renewed your heart’s good cheer?

3 Has He not knit you to His breast,
Made you His spotless bride?
Has not His grand humility
Vanquished your sinful pride?

4 Has He not bound us each to all?
In Him are we not one?
Shall we not have one heart, one mind—
And with all strife be done?

5 Let all conceit and envy die
Shamed by the looming Cross—
Count all self-interest wretchedness,
And vain ambitions, loss.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #9860

Author: Neil Barham

(no biographical information available about Neil Barham.) Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Did Christ descend from majesty
Title: Did Christ Descend From Majesty
Author: Neil Barham (2012)
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

ST. AGNES (Dykes)

John B. Dykes (PHH 147) composed ST. AGNES for [Jesus the Very Thought of Thee]. Dykes named the tune after a young Roman Christian woman who was martyred in A.D. 304 during the reign of Diocletian. St. Agnes was sentenced to death for refusing to marry a nobleman to whom she said, "I am already eng…

Go to tune page >


Media

The Cyber Hymnal #9860
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #9860

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