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Eternity, Eternity, How long art thou, eternity! Yet onward still we speed to thee

Eternity, Eternity, How long art thou, eternity! Yet onward still we speed to thee

Author: Frances E. Cox
Published in 7 hymnals

Full Text

1 Eternity! eternity!
How long art thou, eternity!
Yet onward still to thee we speed,
As to the fight th' impatient steed.

2 As ship to port, or shaft from bow,
Or swift as couriers homeward go;
Mark well, O man, eternity!
Eternity! eternity!

3 Eternity! eternity!
How long art thou, eternity!
As in a ball's concentric round
No starting-point nor end is found;

4 So thou, eternity, so vast,
No entrance and no exit hast;
Mark well, O man, eternity!
Eternity! eternity!

Source: The Voice of Praise: a collection of hymns for the use of the Methodist Church #914

Author: Frances E. Cox

Cox, Frances Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. George V. Cox, born at Oxford, is well known as a successful translator of hymns from the German. Her translations were published as Sacred Hymns from the German, London, Pickering. The 1st edition, pub. 1841, contained 49 translations printed with the original text, together with biographical notes on the German authors. In the 2nd edition, 1864, Hymns from the German, London, Rivingtons, the translations were increased to 56, those of 1841 being revised, and with additional notes. The 56 translations were composed of 27 from the 1st ed. (22 being omitted) and 29 which were new. The best known of her translations are "Jesus lives! no longer [thy terrors] now" ; and ”Who are these like stars appeari… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Eternity, Eternity, How long art thou, eternity! Yet onward still we speed to thee
Author: Frances E. Cox
Publication Date: 1868
Copyright: This text in in the public domain in the United States because it was published before 1923.

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