Hail, thou King of saints ascending

Hail, thou King of saints ascending

Translator: Herbert Kynaston; Author: St. Bernard of Clairvaux
Published in 2 hymnals

Translator: Herbert Kynaston

Kynaston, Herbert, D.D., was born Nov. 23, 1809, and educated at Westminster School, and Christ Church, Oxford (of which he was sometime Student), where he graduated in 1831 (1st class Lit. Hum.). Taking Holy Orders in 1834, he became Head Master of St. Paul's School, London, in 1838; Select Preacher of the University of Oxford, 1842-43; Rector of St. Nicholas-Cole-Abbey, with St. Nicholas Olave, 1850-66; and Prebendary of Holborn in St. Paul's Cathedral, 1853. He died Oct. 1878. His Miscellaneous Poems were published in 1840, and his hymns as follows:— (1) Occasional Hymns (original and translated), 1862. (2) Occasional Hymns, 2nd series, pt. i., 1864. (3) Occasional Hymns, 2nd series, pt. ii., chiefly on the Miracles, 1866. These hymn… Go to person page >

Author: St. Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard of Clairvaux, saint, abbot, and doctor, fills one of the most conspicuous positions in the history of the middle ages. His father, Tecelin, or Tesselin, a knight of great bravery, was the friend and vassal of the Duke of Burgundy. Bernard was born at his father's castle on the eminence of Les Fontaines, near Dijon, in Burgundy, in 1091. He was educated at Chatillon, where he was distinguished for his studious and meditative habits. The world, it would be thought, would have had overpowering attractions for a youth who, like Bernard, had all the advantages that high birth, great personal beauty, graceful manners, and irresistible influence could give, but, strengthened in the resolve by night visions of his mother (who had died in 1… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Hail, thou King of saints ascending
Author: St. Bernard of Clairvaux
Translator: Herbert Kynaston
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

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Offices of Worship and Hymns #434

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