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My ain countrie

I am far frae my hame an' I'm weary aftenwhiles

Author: Mary Lee Demarest
Tune: [I am far frae my hame an' I'm weary aftenwhiles]
Published in 50 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1. I am far frae my hame, an’ I’m weary aftenwhiles,
For the langed for hame bringin’, an’ my Father’s welcome smiles;
An’ I’ll ne’er be fu’ content, until mine een do see
The gowden gates o’ Heav’n an’ my ain countrie.

Refrain
The earth is fleck’d wi’ flowers, mony tinted, fresh an’ gay
The birdies warble blithely, for my Faither made them sae:
But these sights an’ these soun’s will as naething be to me,
When I hear the angels singin’ in my ain countrie.

2. I’ve His gude word o’ promise that some gladsome day, the King
To His ain royal palace his banished hame will bring;
Wi’een an’ wi’ hert rinnin’ owre, we shall see
The King in His beauty, in oor ain countrie. [Refrain]

3. Sae little noo I ken, o’ yon blessèd, bonnie place
I only ken it’s Hame, whaur we shall see His face,
It wad surely be eneuch for ever mair to be
In the glory o’ His presence, in oor ain countrie. [Refrain]

4. He is faithfu’ that hath promised, an He’ll surely come again,
He’ll keep His tryst wi’ me, at what oor I dinnna ken;
But He bids me still to wait, an’ ready aye to be,
To gang at ony moment to my ain countrie. [Refrain]

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #4140

Author: Mary Lee Demarest

Demarest, Mary, née Lee, b. at Corton Falls, New York, in 1838, married to Mr. Demarest, and died at Pasadena, California, in 1887. The story of her poem, "I am far frae my hame," which is given as a Sacred Song by I. D. Sankey in his Sacred Songs & Solos, was written in 1861, and printed in The New York Observer. Its history, too long for quotation here, is given in Mr. Sankey's My Life and Sacred Songs, 1906, pp. 161-2. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)  Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: I am far frae my hame an' I'm weary aftenwhiles
Title: My ain countrie
Author: Mary Lee Demarest

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #4140
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
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