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In the Silent Midnight Watches

In the silent midnight watches, Standing at your door

Author: Arthur C. Coxe (1842); Alterer: E. Gustav Johnson (1948)
Published in 2 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI, Recording

Representative Text

1. In the silent midnight watches,
Standing at your door,
Calls the Savior, pleading, knocking,
Now as oft before.
He would enter with salvation,
Heart oppressed by sin!
Open now the door for Jesus,
Let Him enter in!

2. Death will come some day, relentless,
Come to every man.
None can heedlessly ignore him,
None his entry ban.
Jesus waits in mercy pleading,
At the door today,
Him, not death, the cruel reaper,
You can turn away.

3. When you hear the Savior knocking,
Calling at your door,
O receive Him, let Him enter,
And your soul restore!
Then when breaks the golden morning,
Bright, eternal, fair,
He will open Heaven’s portals
And receive you there.

Author: Arthur C. Coxe

Coxe, Arthur Cleveland, D.D. LL.D. One of the most distinguished of American prelates, and son of an eminent Presbyterian minister, the Rev. Samuel H. Cox, D.D., was born at Mendham, New Jersey, May 10,1818. Graduating at the University of New York in 1838, and taking Holy Orders in 1841, he became Rector of St. John's, Hartford, Connecticut, in the following year. In 1851 he visited England, and on his return was elected Rector of Grace Church, Baltimore, 1854, and Calvary, New York, 1863. His consecration as Bishop of the Western Diocese of New York took place in 1865. His residence is at Buffalo. Bishop Coxe is the author of numerous works. His poetical works were mostly written in early life, and include Advent, 1837; Athanasion, &c, 1… Go to person page >

Alterer: E. Gustav Johnson

Born: May 21, 1893, Väse Vämland, Sweden. Died: November 13, 1974, Miami, Florida. Johnson’s family emigrated to America when he was 10 years old, settling in Hartford, Connecticut. He learned the craft of a printer, but at age 30 took up studies at North Park, Chicago, Illinois, where he earned degrees at the academy, college, and seminary. He went on to graduate from the University of Chicago and Duke University. He started teaching English and Swedish at North Park in 1931, staying there three decades. He also found time to edit the Swedish Pioneer Historical Quarterly. His works include: The Swedish Element in America, 1933 (co-editor) Translation of C. J. Nyvall’s Travel Memories from America, 1876 Translatio… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: In the silent midnight watches, Standing at your door
Title: In the Silent Midnight Watches
Alterer: E. Gustav Johnson (1948)
Author: Arthur C. Coxe (1842)
Meter: 8.5.8.5 D
Language: English
Notes: Alternate tune: SINCLAIR, George F. Root, 1820-1895
Copyright: Public Domain

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #3061
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
Small Church Music #6005
  • PDF Score (PDF)

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)
Audio

Small Church Music #6005

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #3061

Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



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