Jerusalem', benita per lakto kaj miel'

Author: Bernardo el Cluny

Bernard of Morlaix, or of Cluny, for he is equally well known by both titles, was an Englishman by extraction, both his parents being natives of this country. He was b., however, in France very early in the 12th cent, at Morlaix, Bretagne. Little or nothing is known of his life, beyond the fact that he entered the Abbey of Cluny, of which at that time Peter the Venerable, who filled the post from 1122 to 1156, was the head. There, so far as we know, he spent his whole after-life, and there he probably died, though the exact date of his death, as well as of his birth is unrecorded. The Abbey of Cluny was at that period at the zenith of its wealth and fame. Its buildings, especially its church (which was unequalled by any in France); the serv… Go to person page >

English translator: John Mason Neale

Neale, John Mason, D.D., was born in Conduit Street, London, on Jan. 24, 1818. He inherited intellectual power on both sides: his father, the Rev. Cornelius Neale, having been Senior Wrangler, Second Chancellor's Medallist, and Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, and his mother being the daughter of John Mason Good, a man of considerable learning. Both father and mother are said to have been "very pronounced Evangelicals." The father died in 1823, and the boy's early training was entirely under the direction of his mother, his deep attachment for whom is shown by the fact that, not long before his death, he wrote of her as "a mother to whom I owe more than I can express." He was educated at Sherborne Grammar School, and was afterwards… Go to person page >

Esperanto translator: Clarence Bicknell

Clarence Bicknell (27 October 1842-17 July 1918) was a British amateur botanist, painter and archaeologist, with a doctorate in mathematics, and an Anglican priest (in Italy, from 1877 until he left the Church, date unknown). He was born in Herne Hill, England, on October 27, 1842, and died in Tenda (then in Italy, but since 1947 in France) on July 17, 1918. Arriving in Italy in 1877 to work as an Anglican vicar, he built a museum ("Museo Biblioteca Clarence Bicknell") in Bordighera to house his botanical and archaeological collections. He became noted for his identification of the plants and petroglyphs of the Ligurian Riviera. His writings included Flowering Plants of the Riviera and Neighboring Mountains (1885) and Guide to the Prehis… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Jerusalem', benita per lakto kaj miel'
Author: Bernardo el Cluny
English translator: John Mason Neale
Esperanto translator: Clarence Bicknell
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