Light's glittering morn bedecks the sky

Representative Text

1 Light's glittering morn bedecks the sky;
heaven thunders forth its victor-cry:
Alleluia, alleluia.
The glad earth shouts her triumph high,
and groaning hell makes wild reply:
Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia,
alleluia, alleluia.

2 That Eastertide with joy was bright,
the sun shone out with fairer light,
when, to their longing eyes restored,
the glad apostles saw their Lord:

3 He bade them see his hands, his side,
where yet the glorious wounds abide;
the tokens true which made it plain
their Lord indeed was risen again:

4 Jesu, the King of gentleness,
do thou thyself our hearts possess,
that we may give thee all our days
the tribute of our grateful praise:

5 All praise be thine, O risen Lord,
from death to endless life restored;
all praise to God the Father be
and Holy Ghost eternally:

Source: Ancient and Modern: hymns and songs for refreshing worship #208

Translator: J. M. Neale

John M. Neale's life is a study in contrasts: born into an evangelical home, he had sympathies toward Rome; in perpetual ill health, he was incredibly productive; of scholarly tem­perament, he devoted much time to improving social conditions in his area; often ignored or despised by his contemporaries, he is lauded today for his contributions to the church and hymnody. Neale's gifts came to expression early–he won the Seatonian prize for religious poetry eleven times while a student at Trinity College, Cambridge, England. He was ordained in the Church of England in 1842, but ill health and his strong support of the Oxford Movement kept him from ordinary parish ministry. So Neale spent the years between 1846 and 1866 as a warden of Sackvi… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Light's glittering morn bedecks the sky
Latin Title: Aurora lucis rutilat
Translator: J. M. Neale (1851)
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Source: Latin, c. 7th cent.
Language: English

Tune

LASST UNS ERFREUEN

LASST UNS ERFREUEN derives its opening line and several other melodic ideas from GENEVAN 68 (68). The tune was first published with the Easter text "Lasst uns erfreuen herzlich sehr" in the Jesuit hymnal Ausserlesene Catlwlische Geistliche Kirchengesänge (Cologne, 1623). LASST UNS ERFREUEN appeared…

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Timeline

Media

The Book of Common Praise: being the hymn book of The Church of England in Canada (revised 1938) #159b
The Cyber Hymnal #3763
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 8 of 8)
Text

Ancient and Modern #208

Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #443

Church Hymnal, Fifth Edition #274

Common Praise #149

Hymns Ancient and Modern, New Standard Edition #329

Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) #157

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #3763

Text

Together in Song #360

Include 23 pre-1979 instances
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