O Christ of pure and perfect love

O Christ of pure and perfect love

Author: William Booth
Published in 2 hymnals

Representative Text

1 O Christ of pure and perfect love,
Look on this sin-stained heart of mine!
I thirst thy cleansing grace to prove,
I want my life to be like thine.
O see me at thy footstool bow,
And come and sanctify me now!

2 What is it keeps me out of all
1 The love and faith and fire I need?
O drive thy foes from out my soul
Whate’er it cost, howe’er I bleed!
No sin-cursed thing shall I allow
If thou wilt sanctify me now.

3 In vain my fearful heart points back
To failures in dark days gone by;
These shall not drive me from the track
Of heavenly flame once more brought nigh.
To keep thy grace thou’lt show me how,
So come and sanctify me now.

4 O pour on me the cleansing flood,
Nor let thy side be cleft in vain!
‘Tis done, I feel the precious blood
Does purge and keep from every stain.
To all the world I dare avow
That Jesus sanctifies me now.


Source: The Song Book of the Salvation Army #440

Author: William Booth

Rv William Booth United Kingdom 1829-1912 Born in Sneinton, Nottingham, his father, well-off, lost much of his wealth and descended into poverty when William was young. William was apprenticed to a pawnbroker at age 13 to pay for schooling fees. He was converted at 15 and read extensively and trained himself in writing and speech. He eventually became a Methodist preacher. He did evangelistic work with his friend, Will Sansom, preaching to the poor on Nottingham. He would have stayed with Will, but Sansom got tuberculosis and died in 1849. William spent a year looking in vain for work. He finally found work with a pawnbroker in London, but the small amount of pay from that and preaching was insufficiennt, so he resigned as a lay pr… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O Christ of pure and perfect love
Author: William Booth

Timeline

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Text

The Song Book of the Salvation Army #440

Include 1 pre-1979 instance
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