To Look On His Face

O how sweet is the thought that salvation has brought

Author: James Rowe
Tune: [O how sweet is the thought that salvation has brought]
Published in 2 hymnals

Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 Oh, how sweet is the tho’t that salvation has brought,
Which to memory ever will cling;
When my labors are done and the life crown is won,
I shall look on the face of my King!

Chorus:
To look on the face of my King!
What rapture the bliss it will bring!
Nothing else there will be which will satisfy me,
But to look on the face of my King.

2 How it comforts my soul when the trouble-waves roll,
And my heart has no carol to sing,
Just to think that some day, at the end of the way,
I shall look on the face of my King! [Chorus]

3 With the dear ones who wait at the beautiful gate,
I am longing His praises to sing;
But I long o’er and o’er and I long evermore,
Just to look on the face of my King. [Chorus]


Source: Rodeheaver's Gospel Solos and Duets #143

Author: James Rowe

Pseudonym: James S. Apple. James Rowe was born in England in 1865. He served four years in the Government Survey Office, Dublin Ireland as a young man. He came to America in 1890 where he worked for ten years for the New York Central & Hudson R.R. Co., then served for twelve years as superintendent of the Mohawk and Hudson River Humane Society. He began writing songs and hymns about 1896 and was a prolific writer of gospel verse with more than 9,000 published hymns, poems, recitations, and other works. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916) Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: O how sweet is the thought that salvation has brought
Title: To Look On His Face
Author: James Rowe
Refrain First Line: To look on the face of my Kin
Publication Date: 1925
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)

Our Songs of Faith #d83

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Rodeheaver's Gospel Solos and Duets #143

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