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Since without thee we do no good

Representative Text

1. Since without Thee we do no good,
And with Thee do no ill,
Abide with us in weal and woe,
In action and in will.

2. In weal, that while our lips confess
The Lord who gives, we may
Remember with a humble thought
The Lord who takes away.

3. In woe, that while to drowning tears
Our hearts their joys resign,
We may remember who can turn
Such water into wine.

4. By hours of day, that when our feet
O’er hill and valley run,
We still may think the light of truth
More welcome than the sun.

5. By hours of night, that when the air
Its dew and shadow yields,
We still may hear the voice of God
In silence of the fields.

6. Abide with us, abide with us,
While flesh and soul agree;
And when our flesh is only dust,
Abide our souls with Thee.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #6075

Author: Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Browning, Elizabeth, née Barrett, daughter of Mr. Barrett, an English country gentleman, and wife of Robert Browning, the poet, was born in London 1809, and died at Florence in 1861. As a poetess she stands at the head of English female writers, and her secular works are well known. Sacred pieces from her works are in common use in America. They include: 1. God, named Love, whose fount Thou art. Love. 2. How high Thou art! Our songs can own. Divine Perfection. 3. Of all the thought of God, that are. Death. 4. What would we give to our beloved? Pt. ii. of No. 3. 5. When Jesus' friend had ceased to be. Friendship. Based on the death of Lazarus. These hymns are in Beecher's Plymouth Collection 1855; Hedge and Huntington's… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Since without thee we do no good
Author: Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Tune

ABIDING GRACE


BEATITUDO

Composed by John B. Dykes (PHH 147), BEATITUDO was published in the revised edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern (1875), where it was set to Isaac Watts' "How Bright Those Glorious Spirits Shine." Originally a word coined by Cicero, BEATITUDO means "the condition of blessedness." Like many of Dykes's…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #6075
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)
TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #6075

AGO Founders Hymnal #14

Include 3 pre-1979 instances
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