The God we worship now, Will guide us till we die

Full Text

1. The God we worship now,
Will guide us till we die,
Will be our God while here below,
And ours above the sky.

2. How decent and how wise!
How glorious to behold,
Beyond the pomp that charms the eye,
And rites adorned with gold.

3. Far as Thy name is known,
The world declares Thy praise;
Thy saints, Oh Lord, before Thy throne
Their songs of honor raise.

Source: The Sacred Harp: the best collection of sacred songs, hymns, odes, and anthems ever offered the singing public for general use (1991 rev.) #28a

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: The God we worship now, Will guide us till we die
Author: Isaac Watts
Language: Latin
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

AYLESBURY (Chetham)

Also called: WIRKSWORTH WIRKSWORTH was first published in John Chetham's collection A Book of Psalmody (1718) and gained its present shape in James Green's Book of Psalm Tunes (1724). Set in minor tonality, WIRKSWORTH has a folk-like charm. The tune's name derives from the town Wirksworth in Derbysh…

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AMERICA (Thesaurus Musicus)


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