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The God whom earth and sea and sky

Full Text

1 The God whom earth and sea and sky
adore and laud and magnify,
whose might they own, whose praise they tell,
in Mary's body deigned to dwell.

2 O Mother blest, the chosen shrine
wherein the Architect divine,
whose hand contains the earth and sky,
vouchsafed in hidden guise to lie:

3 Blest in the message Gabriel brought;
blest in the work the Spirit wrought;
most blest, to bring to human birth
the long-desired of all the earth.

4 O Lord, the Virgin-born, to thee
eternal praise and glory be,
whom with the Father we adore
and Holy Ghost for evermore. Amen.

Source: Ancient and Modern: hymns and songs for refreshing worship #316

Translator: J. M. Neale

Neale, John Mason, D.D., was born in Conduit Street, London, on Jan. 24, 1818. He inherited intellectual power on both sides: his father, the Rev. Cornelius Neale, having been Senior Wrangler, Second Chancellor's Medallist, and Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge, and his mother being the daughter of John Mason Good, a man of considerable learning. Both father and mother are said to have been "very pronounced Evangelicals." The father died in 1823, and the boy's early training was entirely under the direction of his mother, his deep attachment for whom is shown by the fact that, not long before his death, he wrote of her as "a mother to whom I owe more than I can express." He was educated at Sherborne Grammar School, and was afterwards… Go to person page >

Author: Venantius Honorius Clementianus Fortunatus

Fortunatus, Venantius Honorius Clementianus, was born at Ceneda, near Treviso, about 530. At an early age he was converted to Christianity at Aquileia. Whilst a student at Ravenna he became almost blind, and recovered his sight, as he believed miraculously, by anointing his eyes with some oil taken from a lamp that burned before the altar of St. Martin of Tours, in a church in that town. His recovery induced him to make a pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Martin, at Tours, in 565, and that pilgrimage resulted in his spending the rest of his life in Gaul. At Poitiers he formed a romantic, though purely platonic, attachment for Queen Rhadegunda, the daughter of Bertharius, king of the Thuringians, and the wife, though separated from him, of Lot… Go to person page >

Text Information

Tune

EISENACH (Gesius)

MACHS MIT MIR was first published in the collection of music Das ander Theil des andern newen Operis Geistlicher Deutscher Lieder (1605) by Bartholomäus Gesius (b. Münchenberg, near Frankfurt, Germany, c. 1555; d. Frankfurt, 1613). A prolific composer, Gesius wrote almost exclusively for the churc…

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PUER NOBIS NASCITUR

PUER NOBIS is a melody from a fifteenth-century manuscript from Trier. However, the tune probably dates from an earlier time and may even have folk roots. PUER NOBIS was altered in Spangenberg's Christliches GesangbUchlein (1568), in Petri's famous Piae Cantiones (1582), and again in Praetorius's (P…

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ST. AMBROSE (11234)


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The Cyber Hymnal #2074
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Instances

Instances (1 - 9 of 9)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Ancient and Modern: hymns and songs for refreshing worship #316Text
Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #708
Catholic Book of Worship III #464
Common Praise (1998) #267Text
Common Praise: A new edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern #243Page Scan
Hymns Ancient & Modern, New Standard Edition #309
The Cyber Hymnal #2074TextScoreAudio
Worship (3rd ed.) #405TextPage Scan
Worship (4th ed.) #447Flexscore
Include 23 pre-1979 instances



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