Dear Friend of Hymnary,

As you know, we don't ask for money too often. But we're asking now.

So before you hit the "close" button on this box, please consider a donation to keep Hymnary going.

More than half a million people come here every month -- worship leaders, hymnologists, hymn lovers and more -- people who now have access to the most complete database of North American hymnody on the planet thanks to this site. But keeping all of this afloat does not come without a cost, and we have limited sources of revenue. So if you benefit from Hymnary.org, would you please consider a donation today? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do.

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by clicking the Donate button below, or you can send a check to Hymnary at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546.

On behalf of the entire Hymnary team,
Harry Plantinga

The Promise Was Divinely Free

The promise was divinely free

Author: Isaac Watts
Published in 9 hymnals

Full Text

The promise was divinely free,
Extensive was the grace;
"I will the God of Abram be,
And of his num'rous race.

He said; and with a bloody seal
Confirmed the words he spoke;
Long did the sons of Abram feel
The sharp and painful yoke.

Till God's own Son, descending low,
Gave his own flesh to bleed;
And Gentiles taste the blessing now,
From the hard bondage freed.

The God of Abram claims our praise,
His promises endure;
And Christ, the Lord, in gentler ways,
Makes the salvation sure.



Source: Psalms and Hymns of Isaac Watts, The #II.134

Author: Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts was the son of a schoolmaster, and was born in Southampton, July 17, 1674. He is said to have shown remarkable precocity in childhood, beginning the study of Latin, in his fourth year, and writing respectable verses at the age of seven. At the age of sixteen, he went to London to study in the Academy of the Rev. Thomas Rowe, an Independent minister. In 1698, he became assistant minister of the Independent Church, Berry St., London. In 1702, he became pastor. In 1712, he accepted an invitation to visit Sir Thomas Abney, at his residence of Abney Park, and at Sir Thomas' pressing request, made it his home for the remainder of his life. It was a residence most favourable for his health, and for the prosecution of his literary… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: The promise was divinely free
Title: The Promise Was Divinely Free
Author: Isaac Watts
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Language: English

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 9 of 9)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Church Hymn Book . 3rd ed. #d490
Church Hymn Book; consisting of hymns and psalms, original and selected. adapted to public worship and many other occasions. 2nd ed. #51Page Scan
Hymns and Spiritual Songs, in Three Books: I. collected fromt he scriptures, II. composed on divine subjects, III. prepared for the Lord's Supper #III.IIIPage Scan
Psalms and Hymns of Isaac Watts, The #II.134Text
Psalms, Hymns and Spiritual Songs: selected and designed for the use of the church universal, in public and private devotion; with an appendix, containing the original hymns omitted in the last ed. #357Page Scan
Selection from Tate and Brady's Version of the Psalms; with Hymns by Various Authors, for the Church in Brattle-Square #d266
The Psalms and Hymns of Dr. Watts #530Page Scan
The Psalms of David: imitated in the language of the New Testament, and applied to the Christian state and worship (27th ed.) #II.CXXXIVTextPage Scan
The Psalms, Hymns and Spiritual Songs of the Rev. Isaac Watts, D. D.: to which are added select hymns, from other authors; and directions for musical expression (New ed.) #C3Page Scan



Advertisements