Dear Friend of Hymnary,

As you know, we don't ask for money too often. But we're asking now.

So before you hit the "close" button on this box, please consider a donation to keep Hymnary going.

More than half a million people come here every month -- worship leaders, hymnologists, hymn lovers and more -- people who now have access to the most complete database of North American hymnody on the planet thanks to this site. But keeping all of this afloat does not come without a cost, and we have limited sources of revenue. So if you benefit from Hymnary.org, would you please consider a donation today? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do.

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by clicking the Donate button below, or you can send a check to Hymnary at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546.

On behalf of the entire Hymnary team,
Harry Plantinga

Thee, with the holy self-sprung Fount, we sing

Thee, with the holy self sprung Fount, we sing

Translator: Allen W. Chatfield; Author: Synesius of Cyrene, Bishop of Ptolemais
Published in 2 hymnals

Full Text

Thee, with the holy self-sprung Fount, we sing,
Who art from all eternity great King,
God and of God, immortal, glorious One,
The, only Father's true and only Son!
To Thee, with Him, our praises all belong;
Thee will we crown with choicest flowers of song.
Son of the Father, Thou by birth Divine!
In Thee all bright the Father's glories shine.
And from the Father and through Thee, behold!
The spirit issues--mystery threefold!
And takes the middle place1818See note on Ode V. 1. 57 . of light and mind,
In Trinity and Unity combined.
76
Poured was the sacred Fountain into Thee;
Yet One it was, and is eternally.
The Father's Wisdom, Mind, and beauteous Ray,
Eternal Son, Thou dost to all display.
Of hidden Deity the outstanding light,
In Thee the purposes Divine are bright;
For thus the Eternal Father did decree,
That Thou Beginning to all worlds shouldst be;
And bring to bodies shape and form combined
With powers, from highest source, of thought and mind.
The orb of heaven in wisdom Thou dost guide,
And shepherd o'er the flock of stars preside.
Thou leader art of angels' choir and band;
Thou dost the phalanx of God's hosts command.
And Thou too dost the mortal race befriend,
And all their paths and wandering steps attend.
The Spirit undivided Thou dost spread
O'er earth, and gather back to fountain-head
Thy gifts unwasted; for Thou dost unchain
Death's captives, bringing them to life again.
Accept, my King, this wreath of hymns, from me;
And O! propitious to Thy servant be!
77
Grant Thou calm life: and stay the wandering tide,
And bid the flood through worldly straits subside;
From soul and limbs diseases dire repel;
And all pernicious rush of passions quell.
Or wealth or poverty extreme forefend;
And to just deeds fame honourable send.
Among the people good report accord;
And with persuasion crown the gentle word;
That waveless thus my mind may reap repose,
And I ne'er groan oppressed with earth's dark woes;
But watered from thy heavenly-flowing rill,
My mind I may with wisdom's produce fill.

Songs and Hymns of Earliest Greek Christian Poets, 1876

Translator: Allen W. Chatfield

Chatfield, Allen William, M.A., born at Chatteris, Oct. 2nd, 1808, and educated at Charterhouse School and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was Bell's Univ. Scholar and Members' Prizeman. He graduated in 1831, taking a first class in classical honours. Taking Holy Orders in 1832, he was from 1833 to 1847 Vicar of Stotfold, Bedfordshire; and since 1847 Vicar of Much-Marcle, Herefordshire. Mr. Chatfield has published various Sermons from time to time. His Litany, &c. [Prayer Book] in Greek verse is admirable, and has been commended by many eminent scholars. His Songs and Hymns of Earliest Greek Christian Poets, Bishops, and others, translated into English Verse, 1876, has not received the attention of hymnal compilers which it merits. One… Go to person page >

Author: Synesius of Cyrene, Bishop of Ptolemais

Synesius, a native of Cyrene, born circa 375. His descent was illustrious. His pedigree extended through seventeen centuries, and in the words of Gibbon, "could not be equalled in the history of mankind." He became distinguished for his eloquence and philosophy, and as a statesman and patriot he took a noble stand. When the Goths were threatening his country he went to the court of Arcadius, and for three years tried to rouse it to the dangers that were coming on the empire. But Gibbon says, ”The court of Arcadius indulged the zeal, applauded the eloquence, and neglected the advice of Synesius." In 410 he was made Bishop of Ptolemaïs, but much against his will. He died in 430. Synesius's opinions have been variously estimated. That he wa… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Thee, with the holy self sprung Fount, we sing
Title: Thee, with the holy self-sprung Fount, we sing
Translator: Allen W. Chatfield
Author: Synesius of Cyrene, Bishop of Ptolemais
Language: English

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
Hymns and Poetry of the Eastern Church #73Page Scan
Songs and Hymns of the Earliest Greek Christian Poets #6Text



Advertisements