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There seems a voice in every gale

Representative Text

1. There seems a voice in every gale,
A tongue in every flower,
Which tells, O Lord, the wondrous tale
Of Thy almighty power.

2. The birds, that rise on quivering wing,
Proclaim their maker’s praise,
And all the mingling sounds of spring
To Thee an anthem raise.

3. Shall I be mute, great God, alone
’Midst nature’s loud acclaim?
Shall not my heart, with answering tone,
Breathe forth Thy holy name?

4. All nature’s debt is small to mine;
Nature shall cease to be;
Thou gavest proof of love divine,
Immortal life to me.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #6927

Author: Amelia Opie

Opie, Amelia, née Alderson, daughter of Dr. Alderson, a physician at Norwich, was born there Nov. 12, 1769. In May 1798 she was married to John Opie, the painter, who died in 1807. Originally Mrs. Opie was an Unitarian, but in 1814 she joined the Society of Friends. Most of her subsequent life she lived at Castle Meadow, Norwich, where she died Dec. 2, 1853. Mrs. Opie's prose works were somewhat numerous, and included Father and Daughter, 1801, a most popular tale; Temper, 1812; Tales of Real Life, 1813; and others. Her poetical works were Miscellaneous Poems, 1802; The Warrior's Return and Other Poems, 1808; Lays for the Dead, 1833, &c. Very few of her poems have come into use as hymns. The best known is “There seems a voice in every g… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: There seems a voice in every gale
Author: Amelia Opie

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #6927
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The Cyber Hymnal #6927

Include 66 pre-1979 instances
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