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GREENLAND (Haydn)

GREENLAND (Haydn)

Composer (attr.): Michael Haydn
Published in 73 hymnals


Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI, Recording

Composer (attr.): Michael Haydn

Joann Michael Haydn; b. 1737, Rohrau, Austria; d. 1806, Salzburg Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal, 1908 Go to person page >

Tune Information

Composer (attr.): Michael Haydn
Meter: 7.6.7.6 D
Incipit: 35555 13322 44323
Key: E♭ Major
Source: Lausanne Psalter
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

GREENLAND, an example of the popular nineteenth-century practice of creating hymn tunes from the works of classical composers, is thought to be originally from one of J. Michael Haydn's (PHH 67) "Deutschen Kirchen Messen." The tune acquired its title from its occasional association with the text "From Greenland's Icy Mountains" by Reginald Heber (PHH 249). The harmonization is from Benjamin Jacob's National Psalmody (1819). Jacob (b. London, England, 1778; d. London, 1829) became the organist of Salem Chapel in Soho, London, at age ten. Known as one of the best organists of his day, he was also active as a pianist and conductor. He included his own tunes and harmonizations as well as those of others in the 1819 hymnbook he compiled. GREENLAND has a large range, strong high points, and a rising "rocket" figure at the beginning of the fourth line. It is well suited to choral harmony with brass accompaniment. Because the first two stanzas are sung by believers to believers, the congregation could divide as follows: women on stanza 1; men on stanza 2; all on stanza 3. Sing the hymn with a great sense of rejoicing, but note the change (st. 2-3) to a sense of hopeful expectation that Christ will soon return. --Psalter Hymnal Handbook, 1988

Media

Christian Classics Ethereal Hymnary #708
  • Four-part harmony, full-score (PDF, NWC)
The Cyber Hymnal #2194
Text: How Beauteous on the Mountains
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
The Cyber Hymnal #4994
Text: O Hear Them Marching, Marching
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
Psalter Hymnal (Gray) #333
Text: Rejoice, Rejoice, Believers
  • Bulletin Score (PDF)
  • Bulletin Score (melody only) (PDF)
  • Full Score (PDF, XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 9 of 9)

The New National Baptist Hymnal #103

生命聖詩 - Hymns of Life, 1986 #216

Les Chants du Pèlerin #72

ScoreAudio

Christian Classics Ethereal Hymnary #708

Audio

Small Church Music #2117

Page Scan

Trinity Psalter Hymnal #388

Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreAudioPage Scan

Psalter Hymnal (Gray) #333

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #2194

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #4994

Include 64 pre-1979 instances
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