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In Christ Alone

Scripture References

Confessions and Statements of Faith References

Further Reflections on Confessions and Statements of Faith References

The Christology of the song, “In Christ Alone” is carefully based on the content of the Apostles’ Creed, and the firmness of the convictions here echo the words of Belgic Confession, Article 20, that God gave “his Son to die, by a most perfect love, and [raised] him to life for our justification, in order that by him we might have immortality and eternal life.” “When [his] benefits are made ours, they are more than enough to absolve us of our sins…(Additionally,) the Holy Spirit kindles in our hearts a true faith that embraces Jesus Christ, with all his merits, and makes him its own, and no longer looks for anything apart from him” (Belgic Confession, Article 22).

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In Christ Alone

Additional Prayers

A Prayer of Acclamation with Response Said or Sung
O Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, out of sheer love you who were high made yourself low.
Here in the love of Christ I stand.
 
You suffered the death we deserved.
Here in the death of Christ I live.
 
You reorder human hearts; you reconcile things above and things beneath; you make all things new.
Here in the power of Christ I’ll stand. Amen.
— Cornelius Plantinga, Jr.
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In Christ Alone

Tune Information

Name
IN CHRIST ALONE
Key
D Major
Meter
8.8.8.8 D

Recordings

Musical Suggestion

“In Christ Alone” is a profound expression of the Christian faith set to a most singable tune (another rounded bar form, AABA). There are many occasions when this hymn could be used in worship: for example, in conjunction with a spoken creed, following a sermon, or during the seasons of Easter or Advent.
 
This song can be accompanied by many instruments and textures: organ, piano, guitar, several melody instruments, and hand percussion are stylistically certainly appropriate. Respect the difference between the dotted rhythms and the regular eighth-note rhythms in the tune, enjoy the spiritual vigor of the octave leap in the third phrase, and sing this hymn with energy in a majestic tempo.
(from Reformed Worship, Issue 71)
— Bert Polman
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In Christ Alone

Hymn Story/Background

Stuart Townend and Keith Getty first met in 2000 at a worship event. They had heard much about each other, and though they didn’t know the other personally, they decided to work together on some songs. A few weeks later Getty emailed some melody ideas based on traditional Irish music, and Townend immediately loved the first one he heard and set about working on lyrics. It took him three months to come up with words that satisfied both of them. They wanted to tell “the whole story of Christ coming to earth – the whole gospel story in one song.” Getty was also very dedicated to the song being accessible and singable by all generations. The song has proved to be just that. Released in 2002, it has been covered by over 100 different artists, including Owl City, Newsboys, and Natalie Grant and is a standard in churches and at funerals around the world, especially as a declaration of hope during times of sorrow.
— Laura de Jong

Author and Composer Information

Stuart Townend (b. 1963) grew up in West Yorkshire, England, the youngest son of an Anglican vicar. He started learning piano at a young age, and began writing music at age 22. He has produced albums for Keith Routledge and Vinesong, among many others, and has also released eight solo albums to date. Some of his better-known songs include “How Deep the Father’s Love,” “The King of Love,” and “The Power of the Cross.” He continues to work closely with friends Keith and Kristyn Getty, and is currently a worship leader in Church of Christ the King in Brighton, where he lives with wife Caroline, and children Joseph, Emma and Eden.
 
Keith Getty (b. December 16, 1974) developed a passion for writing good songs for the church in his twenties, and began writing for his small Baptist church. He is passionate about writing theologically astute lyrics and tunes that are easy to sing. Growing up in Ireland, he now lives with his wife Kristyn and daughter Eliza Joy in Nashville. Getty writes and performs predominantly with Kristyn, and the couple regularly tour the United States and the United Kingdom.
— Laura de Jong
Hymnary.org does not have a score for this hymn.
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