What's New at Hymnary.org

Featured Hymn: "The King of Love My Shepherd Is"

"The King of Love My Shepherd Is" by H. W. Baker

In this hymn, we contemplate the good care that our Good Shepherd gives. Even as we acknowledge that we are often “perverse and foolish,” and obviously do not deserve His kindness, God surrounds us with symbols of His loving care. Truly “thy goodness faileth never.”

General Information about Featured Hymns

What is a featured hymn?

Rather than highlighting a featured hymn, this Hymnary.org announcement will explain Hymnary.org Featured Hymns. Hymnary.org has over 200,000 unique hymns and over 1.2 million hymn instances (versions of all hymns). Of these 200,000 hymns, Hymnary.org classifies about 200 hymns as ‘Featured Hymns.’

Featured Hymn: Though Didst Leave Thy Throne and Thy King

“Though Didst Leave Thy Throne and Thy King” by E. E. Elliot

Featured Hymn: O Spirit of the Living God, Thou Light and Fire Divine

“O Spirit of the Living God, Thou Light and Fire Divine” by Henry Hallam Tweedy

In the story of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit's presence is perceived through three images: a mighty rushing wind, tongues of fire, and speaking in many tongues (Acts 2:2-4). The first three stanzas of this hymn elaborate on each image, as a request that the fire of God purify our hearts, that the wind of God strengthen our knowledge, and that we may speak abroad God's love to people of all nations. The final stanza is a picture of the new earth.

Featured Hymn: My Hope is Built on Nothing Less

“My Hope Is Built On Nothing Less” by Edward Mote

Featured Hymn for July 22: "This Is My Father's World"

“This Is My Father's World” by Maltbie Babcock

Featured Hymn for June 27: "There's a Song in the Air"

“There's a Song in the Air” by Josiah G. Holland

“And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God and saying, 'Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!'” (Luke 2:13-14 ESV) This hymn describes the awesome spectacle this angelic concert must have been, and elaborates on its meaning – exultation over the arrival of the King of kings. In the final stanza, we join in that song as it echoes through our time, and we declare the good news of our Savior's birth.

Featured Hymn: "Day by Day"

“Day by Day”

Featured Hymn: Low in the Grave He Lie

“Low in the Grave He Lie”

The stanzas and refrain of this hymn present a contrast between the buried Jesus and the risen Jesus. In the stanzas, He was buried, awaiting the appointed time of resurrection, and there was nothing that could keep Him in the grave – the guards tried, and Death tried, but they were no match for our Lord. The refrain is a jubilant celebration of the Resurrection. Jesus is risen! He is risen indeed! Hallelujah!

Featured Hymn: Alleluia! Sing to Jesus

“Alleluia! Sing to Jesus”

Revelation 5:9 describes this eschatological scene of joy and glory: “And they sang a new song, saying: ‘You are worthy to take the scroll and to open its seals, because you were slain, and with your blood you purchased for God members of every tribe and language and nation.’” In the glorious hymn, “Alleluia! Sing to Jesus!” author William C. Dix invites us to sing that new song of praise to our ascended Savior. This hymn is a declaration of Jesus’ victory over death, and his continued presence among his people.