We don't often ask for money. Just twice a year. This is one of those times. 

So, please, before you hit the "close" button on this box, would you consider a donation to keep Hymnary.org going? 

In April 2020, according to Google Analytics, our Hymnary website had roughly 1.5 million sessions from approximately 1 million users. Both numbers were up 40% from April 2019. Amazing. And what a blessing! But it is expensive to serve all of these people -- worship leaders, hymnologists, hymn lovers and more -- people like you who love hymns.

And we have limited sources of revenue. This fund drive is one critical source. 

So if you benefit from Hymnary.org, would you please consider a donation today? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do. 

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by sending a check to Hymnary.org at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546, or you can click the Donate button below. 

On behalf of the entire Hymnary.org team,
Harry Plantinga

Henry Purcell

Henry Purcell
www.hymntime.com/tch
Short Name: Henry Purcell
Full Name: Purcell, Henry, 1659-1695
Birth Year: 1659
Death Year: 1695

Henry Purcell (b. Westminster, London, England, 1659; d. Westminster, 1695), was perhaps the greatest English composer who ever lived, though he only lived to the age of thirty-six. Purcell's first piece was published at age eight when he was also a chorister in the Chapel Royal. When his voice changed in 1673, he was appointed assistant to John Hingston, who built chamber organs and maintained the king's instruments. In 1674 Purcell began tuning the Westminster Abbey organ and was paid to copy organ music. Given the position of composer for the violins in 1677, he also became organist at Westminster Abbey in 1679 (at age twenty) and succeeded Hingston as maintainer of the king's instruments (1683). Purcell composed music for the theater (Dido and Aeneas, c. 1689) and for keyboards, provided music for royal coronations and other ceremonies, and wrote a substantial body of church music, including eighteen full anthems and fifty-six verse anthems.

Bert Polman


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