A good High Priest is come

A good High Priest is come

Author: John Cennick
Tune: MILLENNIUM (Anonymous)
Published in 26 hymnals

Full Text

1 A good High Priest is come,
supplying Aaron's place,
and taking up his room,
dispensing life and grace;
the law by Aaron's priesthood came,
but grace and truth by Jesus' name.

2 He once temptations knew
of every sort and kind,
that He might succor show
to every tempted mind;
in every point the Lamb was tried
like us, and then for us He died.

3 He died, but lives again,
and by the throne He stands,
there shows how He was slain,
opening His pierc├Ęd hands;
our Priest abides and pleads the cause
of us who have transgressed His laws.

4 I other priests disclaim,
and laws and off'rings too;
none but the bleeding Lamb
the mighty work can do;
He shall have all the praise: for He
has loved, and died, and lives for me.

Source: Hymns to the Living God #215

Author: John Cennick

John Cennick was born at Reading, Berkshire, in the year 1717. He became acquainted with Wesley and Whitefield, and preached in the Methodist connection. On the separation of Wesley and Whitefield he joined the latter. In 1745, he attached himself to the Moravians, and made a tour in Germany to fully acquaint himself with the Moravian doctrines. He afterwards ministered in Dublin, and in the north of Ireland. He died in London, in 1755, and was buried in the Moravian Cemetery, Chelsea. He was the author of many hymns, some of which are to be found in every collection. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872.… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: A good High Priest is come
Author: John Cennick

Notes

A good High Priest is come. J. Cennick. [Priesthood of Christ.] First published in Pt. iii. of his Sacred Hymns for the Use of Religious Societies, London, 1744, No. cxxi. in 9 stanzas of 6 lines, pp. 196-198. In 1753 G. Whitefield included stanzas i. iv. v. vi. and ix. in his Collection of Hymns, No. xliv., and it was retained in subsequent editions. This arrangement, with slight alterations, was republished in Rippon's Selection 1787, No. 190, and later eds., and from thence has passed into other collections in Great Britain and America. In some works it is still further abbreviated. Original text in Lyra Britannica, 1867, p. 134.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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