As the serpent raised by Moses

As the serpent raised by Moses

Author: John Newton
Tune: CONSTANCY (Anonymous)
Published in 21 hymnals

Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 As the serpent raised by Moses
Healed the burning serpent's bite,
Jesus thus himself discloses
To the wounded sinner's sight.

2 Hear his gracious invitation,
"I have life and peace to give,
I have wrought out full salvation,
Sinner look to me and live.

3 Pore upon your sins no longer,
Well I know their mighty guilt;
But my love than death is stronger,
I my blood have freely spilt.

4 Though your heart has long been hardened,
Look on me--it soft shall grow;
Past transgressions shall be pardoned,
And I'll wash you white as snow.

5 I have seen what you were doing;
Though you little thought of me;
You were madly bent on ruin,
But I said--It shall not be.

6 You had been for ever wretched,
Had I not espoused your part;
Now behold my arms outstretched
To receive you to my heart.

7 Well may shame, and joy, and wonder,
All you inward passions move;
I could crush thee with my thunder.
But I speak to thee in love.

8 See! your sins are all forgiven,
I have paid the countless sum!
Now my death has opened heaven,
Thither you shall shortly come."

9 Dearest Savior, we adore thee
For thy precious life and death;
Melt each stubborn heart before thee,
Give us all the eye of faith:

10 From the law's condemning sentence,
To thy mercy we appeal;
Thou alone canst give repentance,
Thou alone our souls canst heal.

The Hartford Selection of Hymns from the most approved authors, 1799

Author: John Newton

John Newton (b. London, England, 1725; d. London, 1807) was born into a Christian home, but his godly mother died when he was seven, and he joined his father at sea when he was eleven. His licentious and tumul¬≠tuous sailing life included a flogging for attempted desertion from the Royal Navy and captivity by a slave trader in West Africa. After his escape he himself became the captain of a slave ship. Several factors contributed to Newton's conversion: a near-drowning in 1748, the piety of his friend Mary Catlett, (whom he married in 1750), and his reading of Thomas √† Kempis' Imitation of Christ. In 1754 he gave up the slave trade and, in association with William Wilberforce, eventually became an ardent abolitionist. After becoming a tide… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: As the serpent raised by Moses
Author: John Newton
Meter: 8.7.8.7
Language: English

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
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The Cyber Hymnal #246

Include 20 pre-1979 instances
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