At the cross her station keeping

Representative Text

1 At the cross her station keeping,
Stood the mournful Mother weeping,
Close to Jesus to the last.

2 Through her heart, his sorrow sharing,
All his bitter anguish bearing,
Now at length the sword has passed.

3 Oh, how sad and sore distressed
Was that Mother highly blest
Of the sole begotten One!

4 Christ above in torment hangs;
She beneath beholds the pangs
Of her dying, glorious Son.

5 Is there one who would not weep,
'Whelmed in miseries so deep,
Christ's dear Mother to behold?

6 Can the human heart refrain
From partaking in her pain,
In that Mother's pain untold?

7 Bruised, derided, cursed, defiled,
She beheld her tender Child,
All with bloody scourges rent.

8 For the sins of his own nation,
Saw him hang in desolation
Till his spirit forth he sent.

9 O sweet Mother! fount of love,
Touch my spirit from above,
Make my heart with yours accord.

10 Make me feel as you have felt;
Make my soul to glow and melt
With the love of Christ, my Lord.

11 Holy Mother, pierce me through,
In my heart each wound renew
Of my Savior crucified.

12 Let me share with you his pain,
Who for all our sins was slain,
Who for me in torments died.

13 Let me mingle tears with thee,
Mourning him who mourned for me,
All the days that I may live:

14 By the cross with you to stay,
There with you to weep and pray,
This I ask of you to give.


Source: One in Faith #416

Author: Jacopone, da Todi

Jacobus de Benedictis, commonly known as Jacopone, was born at Todi in Umbria, early in the 13th century, his proper name being Jacopone di Benedetti. He was descended from a noble family, and for some time led a secular life. Some remarkable circumstances which attended the violent death of his wife, led him to withdraw himself from the world, and to enter the Order of St. Francis, in which he remained as a lay brother till his death, at an advanced age, in 1306. His zeal led him to attack the religious abuses of the day. This brought him into conflict with Pope Boniface VIII., the result being imprisonment for long periods. His poetical pieces were written, some in Italian, and some in Latin, the most famous of the latter being "Cur mundu… Go to person page >

Translator: Edward Caswall

Edward Caswall was born in 1814, at Yately, in Hampshire, where his father was a clergyman. In 1832, he went to Brasenose College, Oxford, and in 1836, took a second-class in classics. His humorous work, "The Art of Pluck," was published in 1835; it is still selling at Oxford, having passed through many editions. In 1838, he was ordained Deacon, and in 1839, Priest. He became perpetural Curate of Stratford-sub-Castle in 1840. In 1841, he resigned his incumbency and visited Ireland. In 1847, he joined the Church of Rome. In 1850, he was admitted into the Congregation of the Oratory at Birmingham, where he has since remained. He has published several works in prose and poetry. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872… Go to person page >

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #26
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
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Instances

Instances (1 - 16 of 16)
Text

Ancient and Modern #177

Breaking Bread (Vol. 39) #120

TextPage Scan

Church Hymnary (4th ed.) #387

Page Scan

Common Praise #104

TextPage Scan

Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #51

Text

Glory and Praise (3rd. ed.) #262

Hymnal #245

Hymns Ancient and Modern, New Standard Edition #69

Text

Hymns of Glory, Songs of Praise #387

Hymns Old and New #44

Text

Journeysongs (2nd ed.) #395

Text

Journeysongs (3rd ed.) #363

Text

One in Faith #416

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #26

TextPage Scan

The New English Hymnal #97

TextPage Scan

Voices United #139

Include 103 pre-1979 instances
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