Brethren let us join to bless

Brethren let us join to bless

Author: John Cennick
Published in 22 hymnals

Representative Text

1 Brethren, let us join to bless
JESUS CHRIST our joy and peace;
Let our praise to him be giv'n,
High at God's right hand in Heav'n.

2 Master, see! to thee we bow,
Thou art LORD, and only thou;
Thou the blessed virgins' seed,
Glory of thy Church, and Head.

3 Thee the angels ceaselss sing,
Thee we praise our Priest and King;
Worthy is thy name of praise,
Full of glory, full of grace.

4 Thou hast the glad tidings brought,
Of salvation by thee wrought;
Wrought for all thy church! and we
Worship in their company.

5 We thy little flock adore,
Thee the LORD for ever more!
Ever with us shew thy love,
Till we join with those above.

Source: A Selection of Psalms and Hymns: done under the appointment of the Philadelphian Association #CCXC

Author: John Cennick

John Cennick was born at Reading, Berkshire, in the year 1717. He became acquainted with Wesley and Whitefield, and preached in the Methodist connection. On the separation of Wesley and Whitefield he joined the latter. In 1745, he attached himself to the Moravians, and made a tour in Germany to fully acquaint himself with the Moravian doctrines. He afterwards ministered in Dublin, and in the north of Ireland. He died in London, in 1755, and was buried in the Moravian Cemetery, Chelsea. He was the author of many hymns, some of which are to be found in every collection. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872.… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Brethren let us join to bless
Author: John Cennick

Notes

Brethren, let us join to bless. J. Cennick. [Praise.] This is one of this writer’s most popular hymns. It appeared in his Sacred Hymns for the Children of God, &c, 1742, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines. One of the first to use it as a congregational hymn was G. Whitefield. He included it in his Collection, 1753, but with alterations. It was repeated by M. Madan, in his Psalms and Hymns, 1760, No. 109, and others. Gradually its use extended until it became known in all English-speaking countries; sometimes as in Whitefield, and again in its original form. Whitefield's text can be distinguished by stanza ii. which opens:—"Master, see to Thee we bow," whilst the original reads, "Son of God, to Thee we bow." Original text in Hymnal Companion, No. 512. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 22 of 22)

A Selection of Psalms and Hymns for ... Diocese of Nova Scotia. 3rd ed. #d41

A Selection of Psalms and Hymns for the Use of the Diocese of Nova Scotia. 3rd ed. #d41

TextPage Scan

A Selection of Psalms and Hymns: done under the appointment of the Philadelphian Association #CCXC

Christian Praise #d48

Church Hymnal, Fourth Edition #360

Church Hymnal, Third Edition #390

Faith Hymns #d17

Page Scan

Faith Hymns (New ed.) #51

Hymns for Public Worship in the Diocese of Fredericton. 2nd ed. #d19

Page Scan

Hymns for the Sanctuary and Social Worship: with tunes #614

Hymns of Worship and Remembrance #d31

Page Scan

Manual for the chapel of Girard College #19

Songs of Victory #d25

The Service of Song for Baptist Churches #d100

The Service of Song for Baptist Churches #d58

Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements