Call Jehovah thy salvation

Representative Text

1 Call Jehovah thy salvation,
rest beneath th'Almighty's shade;
in His secret habitation
dwell, and never be dismayed.

2 There no tumult shall alarm thee,
thou shalt dread no hidden snare;
guile nor violence can harm thee,
in eternal safeguard there.

3 From the sword at noonday wasting,
from the noisome pestilence,
in the depth of midnight blasting,
God shall be thy sure defense.

4 Fear not thou the deadly quiver,
when a thousand feel the blow;
mercy shall thy soul deliver,
though ten thousand be laid low.

5 Only with thine eyes the anguish
of the wicked thou shalt see,
when by slow disease they languish,
when they perish suddenly.

6 Thee though winds and waves be swelling,
God, then hope, shall bear through all;
plague shall not come nigh thy dwelling,
thee no evil shall befall.

Source: Hymns to the Living God #311

Author: James Montgomery

James Montgomery (b. Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland, 1771; d. Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, 1854), the son of Moravian parents who died on a West Indies mission field while he was in boarding school, Montgomery inherited a strong religious bent, a passion for missions, and an independent mind. He was editor of the Sheffield Iris (1796-1827), a newspaper that sometimes espoused radical causes. Montgomery was imprisoned briefly when he printed a song that celebrated the fall of the Bastille and again when he described a riot in Sheffield that reflected unfavorably on a military commander. He also protested against slavery, the lot of boy chimney sweeps, and lotteries. Associated with Christians of various persuasions, Montgomery supported missio… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Call Jehovah thy salvation
Author: James Montgomery (1822)
Meter: 8.7.8.7 D
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

Call Jehovah thy salvation. J. Montgomery. [Psalms xci.] The manuscript of this version of Psalms xci. is not preserved with the Montgomery Manuscript. The paraphrase first appeared in Montgomery's Songs of Zion, 1822; in 5 stanzas of 8 lines, and again in his Original Hymns, 1853, No. 145. As a hymn for congregational use it is generally given in an abbreviated form, both in the older and in modern collections, as in Kennedy, 1863; the Wesleyan Hymn Book, 1875; and others. Original text as above. In America it has attained to a good position, and is sometimes found as, "Call the Lord, thy sure salvation." From this hymn also, the hymn, "God shall charge His angel legions," is taken. It is composed of stanzas iv. and v., and was given in the American Prayer Book Collection, 1826, and later hymn-books.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Tune

TRUST (Mendelssohn-Bartholdy)


ST. OSWALD (Dykes 53617)


HYFRYDOL

One of the most loved Welsh tunes, HYFRYDOL was composed by Rowland Hugh Prichard (b. Graienyn, near Bala, Merionetshire, Wales, 1811; d. Holywell, Flintshire, Wales, 1887) in 1830 when he was only nineteen. It was published with about forty of his other tunes in his children's hymnal Cyfaill y Cant…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #732
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 5 of 5)

Church Hymnal, Mennonite #394

TextPage Scan

Hymns to the Living God #311

TextPage Scan

Rejoice in the Lord #115

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #732

TextPage Scan

Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) #664

Include 206 pre-1979 instances
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