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Come, let our voices join to sing a song of praise

Come, let our voices join to sing a song of praise

Author: William Budden
Published in 10 hymnals

Author: William Budden

Budden, William, contributed a few hymns to the Evangelical Magazine in 1795, &c, under the signature of "W. B." Some of these hymns were reprinted by John Dobell, in his New Selection, 1806. One of these is still in common use:— Come, let our voices join. Sunday School Anniversary. 1st printed in the Evangelical Magazine, Dec, 1795, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines, signed " W. B.," and headed, "A Hymn composed for the use of the Congregation and Sunday School Children belonging to the Rev. Mr. Ashburner's Meeting, Poole, Dorset." In 1806 it was included in Dobell's New Selection, in 1808, in R. Hill's Collection of Hymns for S. Schools, and others. It is generally known to tnodern hymn-books as, "Come, let our voice ascend." This altered form… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Come, let our voices join to sing a song of praise
Author: William Budden

Notes

Come, let our voices join. Sunday School Anniversary. 1st printed in the Evangelical Magazine, Dec, 1795, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines, signed " W. B.," and headed, "A Hymn composed for the use of the Congregation and Sunday School Children belonging to the Rev. Mr. Ashburner's Meeting, Poole, Dorset." In 1806 it was included in Dobell's New Selection, in 1808, in R. Hill's Collection of Hymns for S. Schools, and others. It is generally known to modern hymn-books as, "Come, let our voice ascend." This altered form was given by T. Cotterill in the Appendix to the 6th edition of his Selection, 1815. [William T. Brooke] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 10 of 10)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
A Collection of Hymns: for camp meetings, revivals, &c., for the use of the Primitive Methodists #L451Page Scan
A New Selection of Hymns; designed for the use of conference meetings, private circles, and congregations, as a supplement to Dr. Watts' Psalms and Hymns #443Page Scan
A New Selection of Nearly Eight Hundred Evangelical Hymns, from More than 200 Authors in England, Scotland, Ireland, & America, including a great number of originals, alphabetically arranged #614Page Scan
A New Selection of Seven Hundred Evangelical Hymns ... intended as a Supplement to Dr. Watts's Psalms and Tunes #614Page Scan
A Selection of Hymns, from the Best Authors, Designed as a Supplement to Dr. Watts' Psalms and Hymns #d101
Hymns for Sunday Schools, Selected from Various Authoors #d43
Selection of Hymns for the Sunday School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church #18Page Scan
Selection of Hymns for the Sunday School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church #245Page Scan
The American Baptist Sabbath-School Hymn-Book #386Page Scan
The Baptist Sabbath School Hymn Book #d71
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