Daughter of Zion, awake from thy sadness

Daughter of Zion, awake from thy sadness

Author: Anonymous
Tune: DAUGHTER OF ZION (Mason)
Published in 249 hymnals

Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1. Daughter of Zion, awake from thy sadness;
Awake, for thy foes shall oppress thee no more.
Bright, o'er thy hills, dawns the day star of gladness,
Arise, for the night of thy sorrow is o'er.

Chorus:
Daughter of Zion, awake from thy sadness;
Awake, for thy foes shall oppress thee no more.

2. Strong were thy foes; but the arm that subdued them,
And scattered their legions, was mightier far;
They fled like the chaff from the scourge that pursued them;
In vain were their steeds and their chariots of war. [Chorus]

3. Daughter of Zion, the power that hath saved thee,
Extolled with the harp and the timbrel shall be;
Shout: for the foe is destroyed that enslaved thee;
Th' oppressor is vanquished, and Zion is free. [Chorus]

Source: Christ in Song: for all religious services nearly one thousand best gospel hymns, new and old with responsive scripture readings (Rev. and Enl.) #904

Author: Anonymous

In some hymnals, the editors noted that a hymn's author is unknown to them, and so this artificial "person" entry is used to reflect that fact. Obviously, the hymns attributed to "Author Unknown" "Unknown" or "Anonymous" could have been written by many people over a span of many centuries. Go to person page >

Notes

Daughter of Zion, awake from thy sadness. [Victory of the Church.] This is given in Mason and Greene's Church Psalmody, Boston, U.S.A., 1831, p. 576, in 3 stanzas of 4 lines, as the words of an Anthem, and is stated in the index to have been taken from "Fitzgerald's Collection," which was published. in 1830. It is found in numerous American collections, including Laudes Domini, 1884.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)

An Eclectic Harmony. II #7

Include 248 pre-1979 instances
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