Day all jubilant, all splendid

Author: Adam, de Saint Victor

Adam of St. Victor. Of the life of this, the most prominent and prolific of the Latin hymnists of the Middle Ages, very little is known. It is even uncertain whether he was an Englishman or a Frenchman by birth. He is described by the writers nearest to his own epoch, as Brito, which may indicate a native of either Britain, or Brittany. All that is certainly known concerning him is, that about A.D. 1130, after having been educated at Paris, he became, as quite a young man, a monk in the Abbey of St. Victor, then in the suburbs, but afterwards through the growth of that city, included within the walls of Paris itself. In this abbey, which, especially at that period, was celebrated as a school of theology, he passed the whole of the rest of h… Go to person page >

Translator: Charles Stuart Calverley

Calverley, Charles Stewart, M.A., son of the Rev. Henry Blayds, some time Vicar of South Stoke, near Bath (who took the name of Calverley in 1852), was born at Hartley, Worcestershire, Dec. 22, 1831. He entered Harrow in 1846, from whence he passed to Oxford, but coming under the censure of the authorities, he migrated to Cambridge in 1852, where, after gaining some of the best classical prizes of that University, he graduated first class in Classical honour?. In due course he was called to the Bar and followed the Northern circuit. He died at Folkestone, Feb. 17, 1884. He is known to hymnody through several translations from the Latin, which he made for the Hymnary in 1871, and were published therein in 1872. --John Julian, Dictionary o… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Day all jubilant, all splendid
Author: Adam, de Saint Victor
Translator: Charles Stuart Calverley
Copyright: Public Domain

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Immanuel Hymnal #d82

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