Dear Friend of Hymnary,

As you know, we don't ask for money too often. But we're asking now.

So before you hit the "close" button on this box, please consider a donation to keep Hymnary going.

More than half a million people come here every month -- worship leaders, hymnologists, hymn lovers and more -- people who now have access to the most complete database of North American hymnody on the planet thanks to this site. But keeping all of this afloat does not come without a cost, and we have limited sources of revenue. So if you benefit from Hymnary.org, would you please consider a donation today? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do.

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by clicking the Donate button below, or you can send a check to Hymnary at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546.

On behalf of the entire Hymnary team,
Harry Plantinga

Dear Lord, accept a sinful heart

Dear Lord, accept a sinful heart

Author: William Cowper
Published in 14 hymnals

Author: William Cowper

Cowper, William, the poet. The leading events in the life of Cowper are: born in his father's rectory, Berkhampstead, Nov. 26, 1731; educated at Westminster; called to the Bar, 1754; madness, 1763; residence at Huntingdon, 1765; removal to Olney, 1768; to Weston, 1786; to East Dereham, 1795; death there, April 25, 1800. The simple life of Cowper, marked chiefly by its innocent recreations and tender friendships, was in reality a tragedy. His mother, whom he commemorated in the exquisite "Lines on her picture," a vivid delineation of his childhood, written in his 60th year, died when he was six years old. At his first school he was profoundly wretched, but happier at Westminster; excelling at cricket and football, and numbering Warren Hasti… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Dear Lord, accept a sinful heart
Author: William Cowper

Notes

Dear Lord, accept a sinful heart. W. Cowper. [Self-acquaintance.] First published in J. Newton's Twenty-Six Letters on Religious Subjects, &c, by Omicron, 1774, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, and again in K. Conyers's Collection of the same year. In 1779 it was also iucluded in the Olney Hymns, Bk. iii., No. 26. It is found in a few modern collections, including Dr. Dale's English Hymn Bookm 1874.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 14 of 14)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
A New Selection of Psalms, Hymns and Spiritual Songs: from the best authors; designed for the use of conference meetings, private circles, and congregations (21st ed. with an appendix) #983Page Scan
A Selection of Hymns from the Best Authors.: including a great number of originals: intended to be an appendix to Dr. Watts's Psalms and Hymns. (Woodward's rev. and corr. ed.; Sterotype ed.) #A26Page Scan
Church Melodies, a Collection of Psalms, Hymns and Spiritual Songs #d213
Church Psalmody: a Collection of Psalms and Hymns adapted to public worship #H413Page Scan
Church Psalmody: a Collection of Psalms and Hymns Adapted to Public Worship #413Page Scan
Hymns of Salvation #d32
Manual of Christian Psalmody: a collection of psalms and hymns for public worship #413Page Scan
Melodies of the Church: a collection of psalms and hymns adapted to publick and social worship, seasons of revival, monthly concerts of prayer, and various similar occasions... #d201
Sabbath School and Social Hymns of the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of the U.S.A. #d52
The American Seaman's Hymn Book: a Collection of Sacred Songs for the Use of Mariners #d48
The Christian Psalmist: being a collection of psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs compiled from the most approved authors, and designed as a standard hymn book for public and social worship #319Page Scan
The Liturgy and Hymns of the American Province of the Unitas Fratrum #458Page Scan
The Lyrica: a collection of psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs, adapted to general use #305Page Scan
The Village Hymn book #d54



Advertisements