En una cruz a Cristo vi

Author: John Newton

John Newton (b. London, England, 1725; d. London, 1807) was born into a Christian home, but his godly mother died when he was seven, and he joined his father at sea when he was eleven. His licentious and tumul­tuous sailing life included a flogging for attempted desertion from the Royal Navy and captivity by a slave trader in West Africa. After his escape he himself became the captain of a slave ship. Several factors contributed to Newton's conversion: a near-drowning in 1748, the piety of his friend Mary Catlett, (whom he married in 1750), and his reading of Thomas à Kempis' Imitation of Christ. In 1754 he gave up the slave trade and, in association with William Wilberforce, eventually became an ardent abolitionist. After becoming a tide… Go to person page >

Translator: George P. Simmonds

At four years, George sang hymns with great devotion and enthusiasm. When he was ten he felt called to be a missionary. He retained his love for the Lord and for music throughout his life. So much so, that after the age of one hundred years old even sang solos in large meetings and on television. He began his work as a missionary, along with his wife, Nessie, in Ecuador. Then explored the Amazon area and across the continent. Collaborated in the compilation of "Hymns of the Christian Life." He also worked with the Bible Societies in several South American countries. He then served as pastor of a Hispanic church in the United States of America. He was a prolific translator of 800 hymns and choral songs. He used some pseudonyms as G. Paul S.… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: En una cruz a Cristo vi
English Title: I Saw One Hanging on a Tree
Author: John Newton
Translator: George P. Simmonds
Language: Spanish
Publication Date: 1978
Copyright: Traducción © 1978 Casa Bautista de Publicaciones

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)

Himnos de la Iglesia #129

Audio

Small Church Music #6331

Include 1 pre-1979 instance
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