We ask for donations here just twice a year, and this is one of those times. So, before you hit the "close" button on this box, would you consider a donation to keep Hymnary.org going? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do.

Last month, our Hymnary website had almost 1 million visitors from around the world: people like you who love hymns. To serve our users well takes money, and we have limited sources of revenue. This fund drive is one such source.

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by sending a check to Hymnary.org at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546, or you can click the Donate button below. From the entire Hymnary.org team, our grateful thanks.

Thou Crownest the Year with Thy Goodness

Representative Text

1 Eternal Source of every joy,
Well may thy praise our lips employ,
While in thy temple we appear,
Whose goodness crowns the circling year.

2 The flowery spring at thy command
Embalms the air and paints the land;
The summer rays with vigour shine,
To raise the corn, and cheer the vine.

3 Thy hand in autumn richly pours
Through all our coasts abundant stores,
And winters, softened by thy care,
No more their barren aspect wear.

4 Seasons and months and weeks and days
Demand successive songs of praise;
Still be the cheerful homage paid
With opening light and evening shade.

5 To thee by every right belongs
The sweetest note in all our songs,
But also what must please thee more:
Our lives to serve, our hearts to adore.


Source: The Song Book of the Salvation Army #925

Author: Philip Doddridge

Philip Doddridge (b. London, England, 1702; d. Lisbon, Portugal, 1751) belonged to the Non-conformist Church (not associated with the Church of England). Its members were frequently the focus of discrimination. Offered an education by a rich patron to prepare him for ordination in the Church of England, Doddridge chose instead to remain in the Non-conformist Church. For twenty years he pastored a poor parish in Northampton, where he opened an academy for training Non-conformist ministers and taught most of the subjects himself. Doddridge suffered from tuberculosis, and when Lady Huntington, one of his patrons, offered to finance a trip to Lisbon for his health, he is reputed to have said, "I can as well go to heaven from Lisbon as from Nort… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Eternal source of every joy
Title: Thou Crownest the Year with Thy Goodness
Author: Philip Doddridge
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

Eternal Source of every joy. P. Doddridge. [New Year.] Dated in the D. MSS. Jan. 1, 1736, and first published by Job Orton in his posthumous edition of Doddridge's Hymns, &c, 1755, No. 43, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines, and in J. D. Humphreys's edition of the same, 1839, No. 55. In the D. MSS. the title is, "God crowning the Year with His goodness"; and in the Hymns, "The Year crowned with the divine goodness." It is usually given in an abbreviated form, the number of stanzas varying in the various hymn-books. Its use in Great Britain is much less extensive than in America. The text usually adopted is from the 1755 book, as in Lyra Britannica, 1867, p. 193; that, however, in the Methodist Sunday School Hymn Book is from the Brooke manuscript of Doddridge's Hymns.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Tune

WAREHAM (Knapp)

William Knapp (b. Wareham, Dorsetshire, England, 1698; d. Poole, Dorsetshire, 1768) composed WAREHAM, so named for his birthplace. A glover by trade, Knapp served as the parish clerk at St. James's Church in Poole (1729-1768) and was organist in both Wareham and Poole. Known in his time as the "coun…

Go to tune page >


GERMANY (Gardiner)


ALGONQUIN (Commuck)


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #1375
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)
Methodist Tune Book: a collection of tunes adapted to the Methodist Hymn book #9

Instances

Instances (1 - 3 of 3)

A Selection of Plain Tunes, Set Pieces, and Anthems from Indian Melodies #7

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #1375

Text

The Song Book of the Salvation Army #925

Include 364 pre-1979 instances
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.