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Forget not the dead, who have loved

Forget not the dead, who have loved

Author: James T. Fields
Tune: EDINBURGH (White)
Published in 5 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, Noteworthy Composer
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 Forget not the dead, who have loved, who have left us,
Who bend o’er us now from their bright homes above;
But believe, never doubt, that the God who bereft us
Permits them to mingle with friends they still love.

2 Repeat their fond words, all their noble deeds cherish;
Speak pleasantly of them who left us in tears:
Other joys may be lost, but their names should not perish,
While time bears our feet through the valley of tears.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #10025

Author: James T. Fields

Fields, James Thomas, born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Dec. 31, 1816; was for some years a partner in the Boston publishing firm of Ticknor and Fields, and also the editor of the Atlantic Monthly from 1862 to 1870. From the 1854 edition of his Poems, Putnam has given 13 pieces in his Singers and Songs, &c, 1874, p. 437, one of which, "Thou Who hast called our being here "(Child's Hymn), has come into common use. He died April 24, 1881. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Forget not the dead, who have loved
Author: James T. Fields

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #10025
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #10025

Include 4 pre-1979 instances
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



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