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Fortem, virili pectore

Fortem, virili pectore

Author: Silvio Antoniano
Published in 4 hymnals

Author: Silvio Antoniano

Cardinal Silvio Antoniano, was born at Rome in 1540. Through the influence and patronage of Pope Pius IV. he became Professor of the Belles Lettres in the Collegio Romano, and subsequently rose to be the head of the college, and a cardinal. He died in 1603. [Rev. W. A. Shoults, B.D.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, p. 382 (1907) Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Fortem, virili pectore
Author: Silvio Antoniano
Language: Latin
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

Fortem virili pectore. Card. Silvio Antoniano. [Holy Women.] Included by Pope Clement VIII. In the Roman Breviary, Venice, 1603, f. 37b., in the Common, as the hymn for first and 2nd Vespers, and at Lauds in the Office for the Common of Holy Women. It is also in other Breviaries; Daniel, iv. p. 311, and Card. Newman's Hymni Ecclesiae, 1838-65. The author, Cardinal Silvio Antoniano, was born at Rome in 1540. Through the influence and patronage of Pope Pius IV. he became Professor of the Belles Lettres in the Collegio Romano, and subsequently rose to be the head of the college, and a cardinal. He died in 1603. [Rev. W. A. Shoults, B.D.] Translations in common use:— 1. High let us all our voices raise. By E. Caswall. First published in his Lyra Catholica, 1849, p. 223, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines. It has been included in the Hymns for the Year, and other Roman Catholic collections for Missions and Schools; and in the People's Hymnal, 1867, and other Anglican hymn-books. In Caswall's Hymns & Poems, 1873, p. 118, another translation in S.M. is substituted for this. It begins, "Laud we the saints most sweet." 2. This woman more than woman strong. By J. R. Beste, in his Church Hymns, 1849, p. 59. 3. O'er all the Church thy praise be told. By R. Campbell, in his Hymns & Anthems, 1850, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines. In connection with this translation there are two centos which must be noted. The first is No. 87 in the Hymnal for the use of St. John the Evangelist, &c, Aberdeen, 1870. This is composed of stanza i. this translation, stanzas ii.—iv. From the People's Hymnal as above. The second is No. 417, in the Hymnary, 1872, beginning, "To share the Lamb's high marriage rites." The first stanza of this cento is J. D. Chambers's translation of "Ad nuptias Agni Pater " (Lauda Syon, pt. ii., 1866, p. 47), and the remaining stanzas are this translation by R. Campbell, slightly altered. 4. How blest the matron, who, endued. By the Compilers of Hymns Ancient & Modern, 1861. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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