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Friend after friend departs:

Friend after friend departs:

Author: James Montgomery
Published in 211 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

Friend after friend departs:
Who hath not lost a friend?
There is no union here of hearts,
That finds not here an end:
Were this frail world our only rest,
Living or dying, none were blest.

Beyond the flight of time,
Beyond this vale of death,
There surely is some blessed clime,
Where life is not a breath;
Nor life's affections transient fire,
Whose sparks fly upward to expire!

There is a world above,
Where parting is unknown;
A whole eternity of love,
Form'd for the good alone;
And faith beholds the dying here,
Translated to that happier sphere.

Thus star by star declines,
Till all are pass'd away,
As morning high and higher shines
To pure and perfect day;
Nor sink those stars in empty night,--
They hide themselves in heaven's own light.

Sacred Poems and Hymns

Author: James Montgomery

Montgomery, James, son of John Montgomery, a Moravian minister, was born at Irvine, Ayrshire, Nov. 4, 1771. In 1776 he removed with his parents to the Moravian Settlement at Gracehill, near Ballymena, county of Antrim. Two years after he was sent to the Fulneck Seminary, Yorkshire. He left Fulneck in 1787, and entered a retail shop at Mirfield, near Wakefield. Soon tiring of that he entered upon a similar situation at Wath, near Rotherham, only to find it quite as unsuitable to his taste as the former. A journey to London, with the hope of finding a publisher for his youthful poems ended in failure; and in 1792 he was glad to leave Wath for Shefield to join Mr. Gales, an auctioneer, bookseller, and printer of the Sheffield Register newspap… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Friend after friend departs:
Author: James Montgomery
Meter: 6.6.8.6.8.8
Language: English

Notes

Friend after friend departs. J. Mont¬gomery. [Death and the Hereafter.] In Montgomery's Poetical Works, 1841, vol. iii. p. 182, he has dated this poem 1824. It was published in his Pelican Island and Other Poems, 1827; and in his Poetical Works, 1828 and 1841, but was not given in the first copies of his Original Hymns, 1853. In later copies of the same year it replaced a cancelled hymn (“This shall be the children's cry"), but was omitted from the Index. It is in common use in Great Britain and America. Original text in Dr. Hatfield's Church Hymn Book, N. Y., 1872. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Tune

BATH (Cooke)


DEPARTURE


AYLESBURY (Chetham)

Also called: WIRKSWORTH WIRKSWORTH was first published in John Chetham's collection A Book of Psalmody (1718) and gained its present shape in James Green's Book of Psalm Tunes (1724). Set in minor tonality, WIRKSWORTH has a folk-like charm. The tune's name derives from the town Wirksworth in Derbysh…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #1611
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)

The Baptist Hymnal #622

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #1611

Include 209 pre-1979 instances
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