Go, spirit of the sainted dead

Go, spirit of the sainted dead

Author: J. Newton Brown
Published in 25 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, Noteworthy Composer
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 Go, spirit, of the sainted dead,
Go to thy longed for, happy home:
The tears of man are o’er thee shed;
The voice of angels bids thee come.

2 If life be not in length of days,
In silvered locks, and furrowed brow,
But living to the Savior’s praise,
How few have lived so long as thou!

3 Though earth may boast one gem the less,
May not e’en Heav’n the richer be?
And myriads on thy footsteps press,
To share thy blest eternity.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #9244

Author: J. Newton Brown

Brown, John Newton, D.D., was born at New London, Connecticut, June 29, 1803, and graduated at Madison University, 1823. From 1838 to 1845 he was Professor of Theology at New Hampton, New Hampshire, and from 1845-1849 pastor at Lexington, Virginia. He died in 1868. Dr. Brown was some time editor of the Baptist Publication Society, the Christian Chronicle, and the National Baptist. His works include Encyclopaedia of Religious Knowledge, 1831; Memorials of Baptist Martyrs, 1834; Poems, 1840. His hymn:— Go, spirit of the tainted dead, appeared in The Psalmist (Revs. B. Stow and S. F. Smith), 1843, No. 1100, and thence has passed into other Baptist collections. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)  Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Go, spirit of the sainted dead
Author: J. Newton Brown
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

Go, spirit of the tainted dead, appeared in The Psalmist (Revs. B. Stow and S. F. Smith), 1843, No. 1100, and thence has passed into other Baptist collections. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.]

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #9244
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #9244

Include 24 pre-1979 instances
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.