Great Ruler of all nature's frame

Representative Text

1 Great Ruler of all nature's frame,
We own thy power divine:
We hear thy breath in every storm,
For all the winds are thine.

2 Wide as thy sweep their sounding way,
They work thy sovereign will;
And awed by thy majestic voice,
Confusion shall be still.

3 Thy mercy tempers every blast
To them that seek thy face;
And mingles with the tempest's roar,
The whispers of thy grace.

4 those gentle whispers let me hear,
Till all the tumults cease;
And gales of paradise shall sooth
My weary soul to peace.

A New Selection of Hymns, 1812

Author: Philip Doddridge

Philip Doddridge (b. London, England, 1702; d. Lisbon, Portugal, 1751) belonged to the Non-conformist Church (not associated with the Church of England). Its members were frequently the focus of discrimination. Offered an education by a rich patron to prepare him for ordination in the Church of England, Doddridge chose instead to remain in the Non-conformist Church. For twenty years he pastored a poor parish in Northampton, where he opened an academy for training Non-conformist ministers and taught most of the subjects himself. Doddridge suffered from tuberculosis, and when Lady Huntington, one of his patrons, offered to finance a trip to Lisbon for his health, he is reputed to have said, "I can as well go to heaven from Lisbon as from Nort… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Great Ruler of all nature's frame
Author: Philip Doddridge
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Language: English

Notes

Great Ruler of all nature's frame. P. Doddridge. [Providence.] In the "D. Manuscript." this hymn is No. 54, is headed "God's mercy in moderating the storms of affliction, from Is. xxvii. 8," and is dated "Dec. 10, 1737." The same text was given in the posthumous edition of Doddridge's Hymns, &c, 1755, No. 92, in 4 stanzas of 4 lines, and again in J. D. Humphreys's edition of the same, 1839, No. 108. Its use in Great Britain is limited, but in America it is extensive. The hymn, "Maker of all things, mighty Lord," by E. Osier, in Hall's Mitre Hymn Book, 1836, No. 48, is composed of stanzas i., ii. from this hymn (altered), and the rest by Osier.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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The Cyber Hymnal #2030

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