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Great Source of unexhausted good

Great Source of unexhausted good

Tune: EASTBOURNE
Published in 42 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Full Text

1. Great Source of unexhausted good,
Who givest us health and friends and food
And peace and calm content;
Like fragrant incense, to the skies,
Let songs of grateful praises rise
For all Thy blessings lent.

2. Through all the dangers of the day,
Thy providence attends our way,
To guard us and to guide;
Thy grace directs our wandering will,
And warns us, lest seducing ill
Allure our souls aside.

3. To Thee our lives, our all, we owe,
Our peace and sweetest joys below,
And brightest hopes above;
Then let our lives, and all that’s ours,
Our souls, and all our active powers,
Be sacred to Thy love.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #2031

Text Information

First Line: Great Source of unexhausted good
Source: Exeter Collection

Notes

Great Source of unexhausted good. [Providence Acknowledged.] Appeared in the Exeter Unitarian Collection, 1812, No. 186, in 5 stanzas of 6 lines; headed, "Grateful acknowledgement of God's constant Goodness"; and marked in the Index with an asterisk denoting that it was first published therein. In modern American Unitarian collections, as the Boston Hymn & Tune Book, 1868, No. 148, it is abbreviated to 3 stanzas. [William T. Brooke]

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #2031
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)



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