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Hark, the voice of Jesus calling Come ye laden guilty

Hark, the voice of Jesus calling Come ye laden guilty

Author: Albert Midlane
Published in 5 hymnals

Representative Text

HARK! the voice of Jesus calling:
Come, ye guilty, come to me;
I have rest and peace to offer,
Rest, thou labouring one, for thee.
Take salvation,
Take it now and happy be.

2 Yes, though high in heavenly glory,
Still the Saviour calls to thee;
Faith can hear his invitation,
Come, ye laden, come to me,
Take salvation,
Take it now and happy be.

3 Soon that voice will cease its calling,
Now it speaks, and speaks to thee;
Sinner, heed the gracious message,
To the blood for refuge flee.
Take salvation,
Take it now and happy be.

4 Life is found alone in Jesus,
Only there ‘tis offered thee,
Offered without price or money,
‘Tis the gift of God, sent free.
Take salvation,
Take it now and happy be.


Source: The Song Book of the Salvation Army #240

Author: Albert Midlane

Midlane, Albert, was born at Newport, Isle of Wight, Jan. 23, 1825, and was engaged in business in that town for many years. To his Sunday school teacher he ascribes the honour of prompting him to poetic efforts: and the same teacher did much to shape his early life. His first printed hymn, "Hark! in the presence of our God," was written in September, 1842, at Carisbrooke Castle, and printed in the Youth’s Magazine in November of the same year. Since then he has written over 300, and of these a large proportion are in common use. They appeared in magazines and small mission hymn-books, including:— (1) The Youth's Magazine; (2) The British Messenger; (3) The London Messenger; (4) Trotter's Evangelical Hymn Book, 1860; (5) The Ambassador… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Hark, the voice of Jesus calling Come ye laden guilty
Author: Albert Midlane

Notes

Hark, the voice of Jesus calling, Come ye laden, &c . A. Midlane. [The Invitation of Jesus.] Written in August, 1860, and first published in the Ambassador's Hymn Book, 1861, No. 45, in 4 stanzas of 6 lines. It was repeated in Spurgeon's Our Own Hymn Book, 1866, No. 497; again in many collections for Evangelical Meetings and Home Mission Services; and also in the author's Gospel Echoes, 1865, No. 41. It is also in common use in America and Canada. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
Text

The Song Book of the Salvation Army #240

Include 4 pre-1979 instances
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