Dear Friend of Hymnary,

As you know, we don't ask for money too often. But we're asking now.

So before you hit the "close" button on this box, please consider a donation to keep Hymnary going.

More than half a million people come here every month -- worship leaders, hymnologists, hymn lovers and more -- people who now have access to the most complete database of North American hymnody on the planet thanks to this site. But keeping all of this afloat does not come without a cost, and we have limited sources of revenue. So if you benefit from Hymnary.org, would you please consider a donation today? Even small amounts help, and they also let us know you're behind us and support what we do.

You can make your tax-deductible contribution by clicking the Donate button below, or you can send a check to Hymnary at 3201 Burton SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546.

On behalf of the entire Hymnary team,
Harry Plantinga

Psalm CXLIII

Hear, O my God, with pity hear

Author: Anne Steele (1760)
Published in 4 hymnals

Full Text

I. Hear, O my God, with pity hear
My humble supplicating moan;
In mercy answer all my pray'r,
And make thy truth and goodness known.

II. And O let mercy still be nigh;
Should awful justice frown severe,
Before the terrors of thy eye,
What trembling mortal can appear?

III. My persecuting foes prevail,
Almost I yield my struggling breath;
The chearful rays of comfort fail,
And sink me to the shades of death.

IV. While thus oppressive sorrows flow,
Unintermitting o'er my head;
My inmost pow'rs are whelm'd in woe,
And all my hopes and joys are fled.

V. I call to mind the former days;
Thy ancient works declare thy name,
Thy truth, thy goodness, and thy grace;
And these, O Lord, are still the same.

VI. To thee, I stretch my suppliant hands,
To thee my longing soul aspires;
As chearing show'rs to thirsty lands,
Come, Lord, and fill these strong desires.

VII. Come, Lord, on wings of mercy fly,
My spirit fails at thy delay;
Hide not thy face; I faint, I die,
Without thy blissful healing ray.

VIII. Speak to my heart; the gloomy night
Shall vanish, and sweet morning break;
In thee I trust, my guide, my light;
Teach me the way my feet should take.

IX. My soul's desires ascend to thee,
O save me from my num'rous foes;
To thy kind-guardian wing I flee,
For safe defence and sweet repose.

X. Teach me to do thy sacred will;
Thou art my God, my hope, my stay;
Let thy good spirit lead me still,
And point the safe, the upright way.

XI. Thy name, thy righteousness I plead,
O Lord, revive my drooping heart;
Let these distressing fears recede,
And bid my troubles all depart.

XII. Those unrelenting foes destroy,
Which thus against my peace combine;
Then shall thy service be my joy,
And all my active pow'rs be thine.

Source: Poems on Subjects Chiefly Devotional, Vol. 2 #237

Author: Anne Steele

Anne Steele was born at Broughton, Hampshire, in 1717. Her father was a timber merchant, and at the same time officiated as the lay pastor of the Baptist Society at Broughton. Her mother died when she was 3. At the age of 19 she became an invalid after injuring her hip. At the age of 21 she was engaged to be married but her fiance drowned the day of the wedding. On the occasion of his death she wrote the hymn "When I survey life's varied scenes." After the death of her fiance she assisted her father with his ministry and remained single. Despite her sufferings she maintained a cheerful attitude. She published a book of poetry Poems on subjects chiefly devotional in 1760 under the pseudonym "Theodosia." The remaining works were published a… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Hear, O my God, with pity hear
Title: Psalm CXLIII
Author: Anne Steele (1760)
Language: English
Publication Date: 1760
Copyright: This text in in the public domain in the United States because it was published before 1923.

Timeline




Advertisements