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His voice as the sound of the dulcimer sweet

His voice as the sound of the dulcimer sweet

Author: Joseph Swain (1791)
Tune: SAMANTHRA
Published in 10 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, MusicXML
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1.
His voice as the sound of the dulcimer sweet,
Is heard through the shadows of death;
The cedars of Lebanon bow at his feet,
The air is perfumed with his breath.
His lips as the fountain of righteousness flow,
That waters the garden of grace;
From which their salvation the Gentiles shall know,
And bask in the smiles of his face.

2.
O! thou in whose presence my soul takes delight,
On whom, in affliction, I call;
My comfort by day, and my song in the night,
My hope, my salvation, my all—
Where dost thou at noontide resort with thy sheep,
To feed on the pastures of love?
Say why in the valley of death should I weep,
Or alone in the wilderness rove?

3.
O! why should I wander an alien from thee,
And cry in the desert for bread?
Thy foes will rejoice when my sorrows they see,
And smile at the tears I have shed.
Ye daughters of Zion, declare, have you seen
The Star that on Israel shone?
Say if in your tents my beloved has been,
And where, with his flock, he is gone?

4.
"What is thy Beloved, thou dignified fair?
What excellent beauties has he?
His charms and perfections be pleased to declare,
That we may embrace him with thee."
This is my Beloved, his form is divine;
His vestments shed odor around;
The locks on his head are as grapes on the vine,
When autumn with plenty is crowned.

5.
The roses of Sharon, the lilies that grow
In the vales, on the banks of the streams,
On his cheeks in the beauty of excellence blow,
And his eyes are as quivers of beams.
His voice as the sound of the dulcimer, sweet,
Is heard through the shadows of death;
The cedars of Lebanon bow at his feet,
The air is perfumed with his breath.



Source: The Southern Harmony, and Musical Companion (New ed. thoroughly rev. and much enl.) #322

Author: Joseph Swain

Swain, Joseph, was born at Birmingham in 1761, and after being apprenticed to an engraver, removed to London. After a time he became a decided Christian, and being of an emotional poetic temperament, began to give expression to his new thoughts and feelings in hymns. In 1783 he was baptized by the Rev. Dr. Rippon, and in 1791 became minister of a Baptist congregation in East Street, Walworth. After a short but popular and very useful ministry, he died April 16, 1796 Swain published the following:— (1) A Collection of Poems on Several Occasions, London, 1781; (2) Redemption, a Poem in five Books, London, 1789; (3) Experimental Essays on Divine Subjects, London, 1791; (4) Walworth Hymns, by J. Swain, Pastor of the Baptist Church Meeting… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: His voice as the sound of the dulcimer sweet
Author: Joseph Swain (1791)
Meter: 11.8.11.8.11.8.11.8.
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #2445

Include 9 pre-1979 instances
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



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