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Hither, ye faithful, haste with songs of triumph

Full Text

1 Hither, ye faithful, haste in songs of triumph,
To Bethlehem go, the Lord of life to meet;
To you this day is born a Prince and Saviour:
Oh, come, and let us worship at his feet!

2 O Jesus, for such wondrous condescension,
Our praise and reverence are an offering meet;
Now is the Word made flesh, and dwells among us;
Oh, come, and let us worship at his feet!

3 Shout his almighty name, ye choirs of angels:
Let the celestial courts his praise repeat;
Unto our God be glory in the highest;
Oh, come, and let us worship at his feet!

Source: The Voice of Praise: a collection of hymns for the use of the Methodist Church #153

Author: John Francis Wade

(no biographical information available about John Francis Wade.) Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Hither, ye faithful, haste with songs of triumph
Latin Title: Adeste Fideles
Author: John Francis Wade
Language: English

Notes

Adeste fideles laeti triumphantes. [Christmas.] As to the authorship and actual date of this hymn nothing positive is known. It has been ascribed to St. Bonaventura, but is found in no edition of his Works. Most probably it is a hymn of the 17th or 18th century, and of French or German authorship. The text appears in three forms. The first is in 8 stanzas, the second, that in use in France, and the third the English use, both in Latin and English. The full text [is] from Thesaurus Animae Christianae, Mechlin, N.D. (where it is given as a second sequence for Christmas and said to be "Ex Graduali Cisterciensi"….

Translations in common use:—
16. Hither, ye faithful, haste with songs of triumph. In the American Presbyterian Psalms & Hymns Philadelphia, 1843, No. 174.

-- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)Text InfoTune InfoTextScoreFlexScoreAudioPage Scan
An American Christmas Harp #63
The Cyber Hymnal #2449TextScoreAudio
Include 85 pre-1979 instances



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