Humbly, my God, with Thee I walk

Humbly, my God, with Thee I walk

Author: James Montgomery
Published in 1 hymnal

Representative Text

Humbly, my God, with Thee I walk,
And sweet communion hold;
With Thee in my soul's silence talk,
And all my heart unfold.

But what a heart for Thee to look
Into its depths, and read,
As in the volume of a book,
The thoughts which thence proceed!

Its vain imaginations, vain
Affections and desires,
Its thirst for glory, grandeur, gain,
False hopes, false fears, false fires:--

These would I not from Thee conceal,
Nor thus myself deceive;
No, grant me, Lord, my sins to feel,
To feel them and to grieve:--

Grieve, and with penitence confess,
Till Thou art pleased to show
Mercy on my unrighteousness,
And give me joy for woe.

How blest my lot no tongue can tell,
if such my walk might be,
As seeing Thee, invisible,
For ever seeing me.

Sacred Poems and Hymns

Author: James Montgomery

James Montgomery (b. Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland, 1771; d. Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, 1854), the son of Moravian parents who died on a West Indies mission field while he was in boarding school, Montgomery inherited a strong religious bent, a passion for missions, and an independent mind. He was editor of the Sheffield Iris (1796-1827), a newspaper that sometimes espoused radical causes. Montgomery was imprisoned briefly when he printed a song that celebrated the fall of the Bastille and again when he described a riot in Sheffield that reflected unfavorably on a military commander. He also protested against slavery, the lot of boy chimney sweeps, and lotteries. Associated with Christians of various persuasions, Montgomery supported missio… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Humbly, my God, with Thee I walk
Author: James Montgomery
Meter: 8.6.8.6
Language: English

Notes

Humbly, my God, with Thee I walk. J. Montgomery. [The walk of Faith.] Written "at Dinsdale Hotel, Sept. 14, 1835," and sent in manuscript to several persons from time to time (Montgomery manuscript). It was given in his Original Hymns, 1853, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, as No. 167, and is in common use through a few collections.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
Text

Sacred Poems and Hymns #167

Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.