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I Love My Jesus Quite Alone

Full Text

1. I love my Jesus quite alone.
The Bride, the Bridegroom of my spirit;
No others shall my heart, no, none,
Through love, through loving more inherit.
No man can do at once for two.
For one’s, for one’s will and for t’others:
Therefore I’ll leave all others.

2. The magnet needle erring goes,
When from, when from the pole distracted.
And take before quite no repose,
Till he, till he has her attracted.
And since my heart with Thy love dart
Is touched, is touched by its flaming ether,
Therefore, they haste together.

3. And though Thou art like the north star
In Heav…in Heaven altified
And I on earth so distant far
I’ll fol…I’ll follow undenied.
Still Thee my Light, and my eyesight.
Shall still, shall still be turned to Thee,
From every place, and woo Thee.

Translator (from German): Christopher Witt

(no biographical information available about Christopher Witt.) Go to person page >

Author: Johannes Kelpius

Johannes Kelpius (1667–1708) was a German Pietist, mystic, musician, and writer, interested in the occult, botany, and astronomy, who came to believe with his followers in the "Society of the Woman in the Wilderness" that the end of the world would occur in 1694. This belief, based on an elaborate interpretation of a passage from the biblical Book of Revelation, anticipated the advent of a heavenly kingdom somewhere in the wilderness during that year. Kelpius felt that the seventeenth-century Province of Pennsylvania, given its reputation for religious toleration at the edge of a barely settled wilderness, was the best place to be. Philadelphia had been founded in 1682, but the city and the Province of Pennsylvania had quickly become a to… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: I love my Jesus quite alone
Title: I Love My Jesus Quite Alone
German Title: Ich liebe Jesus noch allein
Author: Johannes Kelpius (before 1705)
Translator (from German): Christopher Witt
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #2898
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)



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