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In Our Day of Thanksgiving

Representative Text

1 In our day of thanksgiving one psalm let us offer
for the saints who before us have found the reward;
when the shadow of death fell upon them, we sorrowed,
but now we rejoice that they rest in the Lord.

2 In the morning of life, and at noon, and at evening,
they were gathered to heav'n from our worship below;
but not till God's love, at the font and on the altar,
had clothed them with grace for the way they should go.

3 These stones that have echoed their praises are holy,
and dear is the ground where their feet have once trod;
yet here they confessed they were strangers and pilgrims,
and still they were seeking the city of God.

4 Sing praise, then, and thanks that God's love here has found them
whose journey is ended, whose perils are past;
they believed in the light; and its glory is round them,
where the clouds of earth’s sorrows are lifted at last.

Source: Evangelical Lutheran Worship #429

Author: William H. Draper

Draper, William Henry, M.A., son of Henry and Lucy Mary Draper, was born at Kenilworth, Dec. 19, 1855, and educated at Keble College, Oxford; B.A. in honours, M.A. 1880. Ordained in 1880, he was Curate of St. Mary's, Shrewsbury; Vicar of Alfreton; of the Abbey Church, Shrewsbury; and since 1899 Rector of Adel, Leeds. Mr. Draper's hymns in common use include the following:— 1. Come forth, ye sick and poor. [Harvest.] Written in 1001 and printed in the Guardian, Sept. 18, 1901. In 1905 it was given, somewhat altered, in The Council School Hymn Book, No. 132. It was also published by Novello & Co., with Music by J. H. Maunder. 2. From homes of quiet peace. [In Time of War.] Published by Novello & Co. in their series of Hymns in… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: In our day of thanksgiving one psalm let us offer
Title: In Our Day of Thanksgiving
Author: William H. Draper (1916)
Meter: 13.12.13.11
Source: "In Remembrance of Past Worshipers"
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

ST. CATHERINE'S COURT


WAS LEBET WAS SCHWEBET


KREMSER

The tune KREMSER owes its origin to a sixteenth-century Dutch folk song "Ey, wilder den wilt." Later the tune was combined with the Dutch patriotic hymn 'Wilt heden nu treden" in Adrianus Valerius's Nederlandtsch Gedenckclanck [sic: Nederlandtsche Gedenckclank] published posthumously in 1626. 'Wilt…

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Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #3024
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 12 of 12)

Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #356a

Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #356b

Church Hymnal, Fifth Edition #469

Page Scan

Common Praise #351

TextPage Scan

Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #324

TextAudioPage Scan

Evangelical Lutheran Worship #429

Hymns Ancient and Modern, New Standard Edition #284

Hymns and Psalms #660

Hymns Old and New #247

TextPage Scan

Rejoice in the Lord #574

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #3024

TextPage Scan

The New English Hymnal #208

Include 7 pre-1979 instances
Suggestions or corrections? Contact us



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