A Beautiful Prayer

Representative Text

1 In the bible [sic] we read of a beautiful pray'r,
A pray'r sent to heaven above;
it was prayed by a heart that was laden with care,
And filled with such wonderful love.

Refrain:
When the Savior was praying,
In the garden of Gethsemane,
He said, "loving Father,
let his cup pass from me;"
I know He was thinking
Of the anguish death would bring to His own
How deep was His sorrow
When Jesus was praying alone.

2 You can catch the sad tone of His voice as he said,
"Thy will not my own must be done;"
As a lamb to the slaughter He soon must be led
To die as the Crucified One. [Refrain]

3 As he prayed there alone in such deep agony,
It was a most beautiful pray'r;
Just to think His great heart was all broken for me,
That He may great sorrow must share. [Refrain]

Source: Melodies of Love #46

Author: Luther G. Presley

Luther G. Presley (March 6, 1887 – December 6, 1974) was a songwriter, musician, and composer, who is best-known for writing the lyrics to the gospel song "When the Saints Go Marching In". Luther G. Presley was born on Beckett Mountain in Faulkner County, Arkansas on March 6, 1887. He studied music beginning at the age of 14, where he excelled. He soon became choir director. He wrote his first song, "Gladly Sing," when he was 17. He furthered his study in singing and music, under renowned teachers. Work Luther Presley wrote the lyrics for the gospel spiritual "When the Saints Go Marching In", in 1937, while Virgil O. Stamps composed the music and melody to the famous work. Luther Presley was inducted into the Southern Gospel Mus… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: In the Bible we read of a beautiful prayer
Title: A Beautiful Prayer
Author: Luther G. Presley
Language: English
Refrain First Line: When the Savior was praying
Copyright: Public Domain

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 4 of 4)

Church Gospel Songs and Hymns #291

Text

Melodies of Love #46

Praise for the Lord (Expanded Edition) #2

Sacred Selections for the Church #32

Include 5 pre-1979 instances
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