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Jesus, whose glory's streaming rays

Jesus, whose glory's streaming rays

Translator: John Wesley; Author: Wolfgang Christoph Dessler
Published in 25 hymnals

Translator: John Wesley

John Wesley, the son of Samuel, and brother of Charles Wesley, was born at Epworth, June 17, 1703. He was educated at the Charterhouse, London, and at Christ Church, Oxford. He became a Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford, and graduated M.A. in 1726. At Oxford, he was one of the small band consisting of George Whitefield, Hames Hervey, Charles Wesley, and a few others, who were even then known for their piety; they were deridingly called "Methodists." After his ordination he went, in 1735, on a mission to Georgia. The mission was not successful, and he returned to England in 1738. From that time, his life was one of great labour, preaching the Gospel, and publishing his commentaries and other theological works. He died in London, in 17… Go to person page >

Author: Wolfgang Christoph Dessler

Dessler, Wolfgang Christoph, son of Nicolaus Dessler, jeweller, at Nürnberg, was born at Nürnberg, Feb. 11, 1660. His father wished him to become a goldsmith, but, as he was not physically suited for this, he was permitted to begin the study of theology at the University of Altdorf. His poverty and bodily weakness forced him to leave before completing his course, and, returning to Nurnberg, he supported himself there as a proof reader. Becoming acquainted with Erasmus Finx or Francisci, then residing in Nürnberg, he was employed by Finx as his amanuensis, and at his request translated many foreign religious works into German. In 1705 he was appointed Conrector of the School of the Holy Ghost at Nürnberg, where he laboured with zeal and… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Jesus, whose glory's streaming rays
Original Language: German
Translator: John Wesley
Author: Wolfgang Christoph Dessler
Language: English

Notes

Mein Jesu dem die Seraphinen. [Ascension.] Founded on Jeremiah x. 7. First published 1692, as above, p. 348, along with Meditation xii., which is entitled "Christ's kingly and unapproachable glory.” Thence as No. 278 in Freylinghausen's Gesang-Buch, 1704, and recently as No. 422 in the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, in 8 stanzas of 8 lines. Translated as:—
1. Jesu, Whose glory's streaming rays, a spirited translation, omitting stanzas vii.. viii., by J. Wesley, in Hymns & Sacred Poems, 1739 (Poetical Works, 1868-72, vol. i. p. 89). In the Wesleyan Hymn Book, 1780, stanzas i.-iii. were included as No. 129 (edition 1875, No. 133), and stanzsa iv.-vi., beginning "Into Thy gracious hands I fall," as No. 188 (edition 1875, No. 196). Recently the first part has been given in America as No. 64 in H. L. Hastings's Hymnal, 1880, and the second as No. 496 in the Methodist Episcopal Hymn Book, 1849, and as No. 464 in the Pennsylvania Lutheran Church Book, 1868.

--Excerpts from
John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 25 of 25)

A Collection of Hymns Adapted to the Use of the Methodist Episcopal Church #d254

A Collection of Hymns for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Rev. with a Supplement #d266

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A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the Methodist Episcopal Church #185

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A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the Methodist Episcopal Church #185

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A Collection of Hymns, for the Use of the People Called Methodists, with a Supplement #133

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A Collection of Hymns #185

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A Collection of Hymns #133

Hymn Book of the Holiness Movement Church #d226

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Hymns for the Use of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Rev. ed. #407

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Hymns selected from various authors #176

Methodist Hymn and Tune Book #d370

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Methodist Hymn-Book #307

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New Hymn and Tune book #147d

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New Hymn and Tune Book #147d

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Plymouth Collection #a524

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Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes; for the use of Christian Congregations #524

Social Hymns, Original and Selected #d79

Songs of Pilgrimage, a Hymnal for the Churches of Christ, Part I #d91

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Songs of Pilgrimage #64

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The Baptist Hymn and Tune Book #524

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The Heart and Voice #77b

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The Reformed Methodist Pocket Hymnal #I.78

The Sacred Lyre #d138

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