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What though my joys and comfort die?
The Lord my savior liveth.
What though the darkness gather round?
Songs in the night he giveth.

(My Life Flows On In Endless Song)

Exurgat Deus

Let God arise and then his foes

Author: Thomas Sternhold
Tune: 68 PSALM
Published in 2 hymnals

Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 Let God arise, and then his foes
will turn themselves to flight,
His enemies for fear shall run,
and scatter out of sight:

2 And as wax melts before the fire,
and wind blows smoke away,
So in the presence of the Lord
the wicked shall decay.

3 But righteous men before the Lord
shall heartily rejoice,
They shall be glad and merry all,
and chearful in their voice.

4 Sing praise, sing praise unto the Lord,
who rideth on the sky;
Extol the great Jehovah's Name,
and him still magnify:

5 The same is he, that is above
within his holy place,
The father of the fatherless,
and judge of widows case:

6 Houses and issue both he gives
unto the comfortless,
He bringeth bondmen out of thrall,
and rebels to distress.

7 When thou didst march before thy folk
th' Egyptians from among,
And brought'st them thro' the wilderness,
which was both wide and long;

8 The earth did shake, the heav'ns did drop,
great thunder-claps were heard,
Mount Sinai also moved was,
when Israel's God appear'd:

9 Thy heritage with drops of rain
abundantly was wash'd;
And if so be it barren was,
by thee it was refresh'd:

10 Thy chosen flock doth there remain,
thou hast prepar'd that place,
And for the poor thou dost provide
of thy especial grace.

The Second part.

11 God will give women causes just
to magnify his Name,
When as his people triumphs make,
and purchase mighty fame.

12 Puissant kings, for all their pow'r,
shall flee and take the foil,
And women which remain at home
shall help to part the spoil.

13 And tho' ye were as black as pots,
your hue shall pass the dove,
Whose wings and feathers seem to have
silver and gold above.

14 When God shall triumph in this land
o'er kings both high and low,
Then shall it be like Salmon hill,
as white as is the snow.

15 Tho' Basan be a fruitful hill,
and in height others pass,
Yet Sion, God's most holy hill,
doth far excel in grace.

16 Why leap ye thus, ye hills most high,
and thus in pride do swell?
The hill of Sion God doth love,
And there will ever dwell.

17 God's army twenty thousand is
of angels great and strong;
The Lord also in Sinai
is present them among.

18 Thou didst, O Lord, ascend on high,
and captive led'st them all,
Who in times past thy chosen flock
in bondage did enthral.

19 Thou hast receivèd gifts for men,
ev'n for thy enemies,
Unto the end that God the Lord
might dwell with them likewise,

20 Now praised be the Lord, for that
he pours on us such grace;
From day to day he is the God
both of our health and peace.

The Third Part.

21 He is the God, from whom alone
salvation we obtain,
He is the God, by whom we 'scape
all dangers, death and pain:

22 And he shall wound the head of all
his enemies also,
The hairy scalp of such as on
in wickedness still go.

23 From Basan will I bring, said he,
my people and my sheep,
And all my own, as I have done,
from dangers of the deep,

24 And make them dip their feet in blood
of those that hate my Name;
The tongues of dogs they shall be red
with licking of the same.

25 Thy goings they have seen, O God,
unto their own disgrace,
How thou, my God and King, dost go
within thy holy place;

26 The singers go before with joy,
the minstrels make no stay,
And in the midst the damsels do
with timbrels sweetly play.

27 Now in the congregations thou,
O Israel, praise the Lord,
And Jacob's whole posterity,
give thanks with one accord:

28 The chief was little Benjamin,
but Judah made their host,
With Zabulon and Nephthalim,
who dwelt about their coast.

29 Thy God hath sent forth strength for thee;
O God, make firm and sure
The thing, that thou hast wrought in us
for ever to endure:

30 Then in thy temple gifts will we,
offer to thee, O Lord,
And in thy own Jerusalem
praise thee with one accord;

The Fourth Part.

31 Yea, and strange kings, by us subdu'd,
shall do like in those days;
For unto thee they shall present
their gifts of laud and praise.

32 He shall destroy the spearmen's ranks,
the calves and bulls of might,
And make them tribute pay, and daunt
all such as love to fight.

33 Then shall the lords of Egypt come,
and presents with them bring;
The Moors also stretch out their hands
to God, their Lord and King.

34 Therefore, ye kingdoms of the earth,
give praise unto the Lord;
Sing psalms to God with one consent,
thereto let all accord,

35 For he doth ride, and ever did
above the heav'ns most bright,
And by his fearful thunder-claps
men may well know his might.

36 Therefore the strength of Israel
ascribe to God on high,
Whose might and pow'r doth far extend
above the cloudy sky.

37 O God, thy holiness and pow'r
is dread for evermore;
The God of Israel gives us strength,
therefore his Name adore.

Source: The Whole Book of Psalms #LXVIII

Author: Thomas Sternhold

Thomas Sternhold was Groom of the Robes to Henry VIII and Edward VI. With Hopkins, he produced the first English version of the Psalms before alluded to. He completed fifty-one; Hopkins and others composed the remainder. He died in 1549. Thirty-seven of his psalms were edited and published after his death, by his friend Hopkins. The work is entitled "All such Psalms of David as Thomas Sternhold, late Groome of the King's Majestye's Robes, did in his Lyfetime drawe into Englyshe Metre." Of the version annexed to the Prayer Book, Montgomery says: "The merit of faithful adherence to the original has been claimed for this version, and need not to be denied, but it is the resemblance which the dead bear to the living." Wood, in his "Athe… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Let God arise and then his foes
Title: Exurgat Deus
Author: Thomas Sternhold

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 2 of 2)
TextPage Scan

The Whole Book of Psalms #LXVIII

TextAudioPage Scan

The Whole Booke of Psalmes #35

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