Let Jacob to his Maker sing

Let Jacob to his Maker sing

Author: Philip Doddridge
Tune: LOUELLA
Published in 3 hymnals

Printable scores: PDF, Noteworthy Composer
Audio files: MIDI

Representative Text

1 Let Jacob to his maker sing,
And praise his great redeeming king;
Called by a new, a gracious name,
Let Israel loud his God proclaim.

2 He knows our souls in all their fears,
And gently wipes our falling tears,
Forms trembling voices to a song,
And bids the feeble heart be strong.

3 Then let the rivers swell around,
And rising floods o’erflow the ground;
Rivers and floods and seas divide,
And homage pay to Israel’s guide.

4 Then let the fires their rage display,
And flaming terrors bar the way;
Unburnt, unsinged He leads them through,
And makes the flames refreshing, too.

5 The fires but on their bonds shall prey,
The floods but wash their stains away,
And grace divine new trophies raise
Amidst the deluge, and the blaze.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #11330

Author: Philip Doddridge

Philip Doddridge (b. London, England, 1702; d. Lisbon, Portugal, 1751) belonged to the Non-conformist Church (not associated with the Church of England). Its members were frequently the focus of discrimination. Offered an education by a rich patron to prepare him for ordination in the Church of England, Doddridge chose instead to remain in the Non-conformist Church. For twenty years he pastored a poor parish in Northampton, where he opened an academy for training Non-conformist ministers and taught most of the subjects himself. Doddridge suffered from tuberculosis, and when Lady Huntington, one of his patrons, offered to finance a trip to Lisbon for his health, he is reputed to have said, "I can as well go to heaven from Lisbon as from Nort… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Let Jacob to his Maker sing
Author: Philip Doddridge

Notes

Let Jacob to his Maker sing. P. Doddridge. [God the Guide of Israel.] First published in Job Orton's edition of Doddridge's (posthumous) Hymns, &c, 1755, No. 102, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines, and again in J. D. Humphreys's edition of the same, 1839, No. 118. It is in common use in its full form in America, and also, beginning with stanza ii. as "God knows our souls in all their fears," in the Boston Church Pastorals, 1864.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #11330
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)

Instances

Instances (1 - 1 of 1)
TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #11330

Include 2 pre-1979 instances
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