Lord, we adore thy wondrous name

Lord, we adore thy wondrous name

Author: Philip Doddridge
Published in 29 hymnals

Representative Text

1 Lord! we adore thy wondrous name;
And make that name our trust,
Which rais'd at first this curious frame
From mean and lifeless dust.

2 Awhile these frail machines endure,
The fabric of a day;
Then, know their vital pow'rs no more,
But moulder back to clay.

3 Yet, Lord! whate'er is felt or fear'd,
This thought is our repose,
That he, by whom our frame was rear'd,
Its various frailties knows.

4 Thou view'st us with a pitying eye,
While struggling with our load;
In pains and dangers thou art nigh,
Our Father, and our God.

5 Gently supported by thy love,
We tend to realms of peace;
Where ev'ry pain shall far remove,
And ev'ry weakness cease.

Source: A Collection of Hymns and A Liturgy: for the use of Evangelical Lutheran Churches; to which are added prayers for families and individuals #483

Author: Philip Doddridge

Doddridge, Philip, D.D., was born in London, June 26, 1702. His grandfather was one of the ministers under the Commonwealth, who were ejected in 1662. His father was a London oilman. He was offered by the Duchess of Bedford an University training for ordination in the Church of England, but declined it. He entered Mr. Jennings's non-conformist seminary at Kibworth instead; preached his first sermon at Hinckley, to which Mr. Jennings had removed his academy. In 1723 he was chosen pastor at Kibworth. In 1725 he changed his residence to Market Harborough, still ministering at Kibworth. The settled work of his life as a preceptor and divine began in 1729, with his appointment to the Castle Hill Meeting at Northampton, and continued till in the… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: Lord, we adore thy wondrous name
Author: Philip Doddridge
Copyright: Public Domain

Notes

Lord, we adore Thy wondrous Name. P. Doddridge. Divine Compassion.] Written Oct. 29,1735 (D. MSS. No. v.), and published in Job Orton's edition of Doddridge's (posthumous) Hymns, &c, 1755, No. 55, iu 6 stanzas of 4 lines, and again in J. D. Humphreys's edition of the same, 1839, No. 68. The original heading is "The frailties of human nature, and God's gracious regard to it. Psalms ciii. 14." In modern hymn-books it is usually abbreviated. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Instances

Instances (1 - 29 of 29)

A Collection of Hymns from Various Authors. New ed. #d205

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A Collection of Hymns, for the Christian Church and Home #87

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Christian Worship #113

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Christian Worship (10th ed.) #113

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Christian Worship (6th ed.) #113

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Christian Worship. (3rd ed.) #113

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Christian Worship. (45th ed.) #113

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Christian Worship. 16th ed. #113

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Publick Worship #XC

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Publick Worship #XC

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for Social and Private Worship #P.CIIIc

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns for the Sanctuary #486

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A Collection of Psalms and Hymns, for Social and Private Worship #249

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Hymns for the Sanctuary #127

Hymns, Selected from Various Authors, for the Use of the Unitarian Church in Washington #d87

Psalms and Hymns, for Social and Private Worship #d268

The Chapel Hymn Book (4th ed.) #d219

The Chapel Hymn Book. 5th ed. #d215

The Christian Psalter #d316

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The Springfield Collection of Hymns for Sacred Worship #189

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