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Messiah at thy glad approach

Full Text

1 Messiah! at Thy glad approach
The howling winds are still;
Thy praises fill the lonely waste,
And breathe from every hill.

2 The incense of the spring ascends
Upon the morning gale;
Red o’er the hill the roses bloom,
The lilies in the vale.

3 Renewed, the earth a robe of light,
A robe of beauty wears;
And in new heav’ns a brighter Sun
Leads on the promised years.

4 Let Israel to the Prince of Peace
The loud hosanna sing;
With hallelujahs, and with hymns,
O Zion, hail thy king.

Source: The Cyber Hymnal #11554

Author: John Logan

Logan, John, son of a farmer, born at Fala, Midlothian, 1748, and educated at Edinburgh University, in due course entering the ministry of the Church of Scotland and becoming the minister of South Leith in 1770. During the time he held this charge he delivered a course of lectures on philosophy and history with much success. While he was thus engaged, the chair of Universal History in the University became vacant; but as a candidate he was unsuccessful. A tragedy, entitled Runnamede, followed. He offered it to the manager of Covent Garden Theatre, but it was interdicted by the Lord Chamberlain "upon suspicion of having a seditious tendency." It was subsequently acted in Edinburgh. In 1775 he formed one of the Committee by whom the Translati… Go to person page >

Author: Michael Bruce

Bruce, Michael, son of a Scottish weaver, was born at Kinnesswood, Portmoak, Kinrossshire, Scotland, March 27,1746, and educated at the village school, Edinburgh University (where he first became acquainted with John Logan), and the Theological Hall of the Associate Synod, held at Kinross, under the Rev. John Swanston, intending ultimately to enter the ministry, a hope which was frustrated by his untimely death. To assist in procuring University fees and maintenance he for some time conducted a school, during the recess, at Gairney Bridge, and subsequently at Forrest Mill, near Tillicoultry. Whilst yet a student he died at Kinnesswood, July 5th, 1767. [Also, see Logan, John] The names of Michael Bruce and John Logan are brought together… Go to person page >

Text Information

Notes

Messiah! at Thy glad approach. M. Bruce. [Adven.] This hymn, which we have ascribed to M. Bruce (q.v.) on evidence given in his memoir in this work, was written probably about 1764-65, for a singing class at Kinnesswood, Scotland, and was first published by John Logan in his Poems, 1781, p. 113, No. 7, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. Although a vigorous hymn, and possessing much poetic beauty, it has not come into extensive use. In the American Church Praise Book, N. Y., 1881, stanzas vi. and iv. are given as "Let Israel to the Prince of Peace." Original text as in Logan's Poems in Dr. Grosart's Works of M. Bruce, 1865, p. 144.

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #11554
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer Score (NWC)



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